PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Labor minister tells Histadrut to 'propose new ideas and not recycle issues' after organization demands improvement in safety at building sites... Read Story
NLRB proposes a new joint-employer rule to replace browning-ferris, adding "substantial" control requirement in determining employment status. Read Story
October 1, 2018 - Cleveland-Cliffs Inc., Cleveland, and the United Steelworkers announced jointly a tentative agreement for a new 4-year labor contrac... Read Story
Union say tariffs have increased corporate profits, but have not yet created jobs, or improved wages and conditions for workers... Read Story
Signs that the potential impact of sanctions on Iran could be mitigated made oil prices drop for the third consecutive day.Author: DANIEL LOGAN BERG-MUNCH, Category: News... Read Story
Lianna Schechter needs your help today! Strike Solidarity - San Diego - ****BREAKING**** WESTIN GASLAMP WORKERS ARE ON STRIKE! One Job Should Be Enough for all workers to provide for their families. Marriott is the largest and richest hotel company in the world. This money was made on the backs... Read Story
Public pensions are pressuring Wall Street to help toy workers denied severance. The giant funds are increasingly flexing their financial might on social issues. Read Story
Hazards, number 143, 2018 McBurned? Abused fast food workers have got a beef with McDonald’s On the heels of a successful organising campaign at fast food giant McDonald’s, the union BFAWU is now targeting safety problems at the burger chain. It found its insecure workforce had plenty to be worried about.   McDonald’s workers told BFAWU organisers they routinely experienced slips on spills that had not been cleaned or signposted, musculoskeletal pain from long periods of standing with inadequate rest breaks, or exposure to air pollution while staffing Drive-Thru windows. But burns on hot surfaces and fat fryers topped the list of under-reported painful problems. According to the union: “As part of our organising work with members, we identified a genuine risk to McDonald’s workers of suffering avoidable burns injuries, and wanted to help them to take action. We want workers to know that burns are not, and should never be, ‘part and parcel’ of the job.” The union’s new McBurned campaign is urging McDonald’s workers who have been burned “to speak up – confidentially - and to consider making a personal injury claim.” Ian Hodson, national president of BFAWU, said: “Members working in the fast food industry have increasingly been raising concerns about workplace burns and we’re taking the issue seriously.” He added: “We will not stand by while our members get #McBurned. We’re backing this campaign as a way for workers to come forward for legal advice, to help us as a union identify accident hotspots and to provide support to those who have been quite literally burned by McDonald’s’ disregard for their safety.” The union is critical of the company’s attempts to put a health gloss on unhealthy employment practices. In August 2018, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) welcomed McDonald’s as a partner in its Global Initiative on Decent Jobs for Youth.  The move by the UN’s labour standards body prompted outrage from unions, who say the global fast food firm is no champion of decent work, but is instead guilty of routine safety and employment rights abuses. The 22 August ILO news release quickly disappeared from the ILO website, after global union confederation ITUC and the international food union IUF requested an urgent meeting with the ILO director general to discuss the labour standards body’s corporate partnerships. The global union bodies said the fight against rights abuses committed by McDonald’s has included union campaigns in the UK, the US, the Philippines, Korea, New Zealand and Brazil. BFAWU’s Ian Hodson accused McDonald’s of being a “global exploiter,” adding: “In one instance they sacked workers for raising genuine concerns for health and safety which we believe are contrary to the principles the ILO claims to champion on its website ‘Promoting Jobs Protecting People’.” McDonald’s is still listed as a partner on the ILO’s dedicated Decent Jobs for Youth website.   GET THE MESSAGE   McStrikers Kayleigh O’Neill and Lauren McCourt were joined by TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady and Ronnie Draper, general secretary of the fast food union BFAWU, to deliver a February 2018 letter to McDonald’s chief executive Paul Pomeroy. The message calls for protection from abusive customers and for union recognition.   UNHEALTHY RECIPE   In August 2018, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) announced: “McDonald’s ties up with the Global Initiative on Decent Jobs for Youth,” adding: “Leading quick-service restaurant brand joins 43 partners who have pledged to reduce barriers to decent employment for youth while boosting access to decent work around the globe.” The news release was hastily removed from the ILO’s website after global unions questioned the UN body’s cosy ‘corporate partnerships’.   McStrike McDonald’s was stunned by the strength of public support for strikes and protests outside UK outlets in September 2017 and May 2018. The media savvy burger joint found itself being out-gunned, with a ‘tidal wave’ of tweets, videos and other social media #McStrike postings exposing low wages, insecure work and poor conditions in McDonald’s.   McBurned Unions say burns shouldn’t be part of the job. The #McBurned safety campaign is the latest phase of their Fast Food Rights push. McDonald’s workers have responded by publishing photographs of their injuries on Facebook.   Action everywhere Workers worldwide are teaming up with unions and other labour rights groups challenging exploitative employment practices, low wages and hazardous jobs at McDonald’s. Global food union IUF said the fight against rights abuses committed by McDonald’s has included union campaigns in the US, the UK, the Philippines, Korea, New Zealand and Brazil.   Pay up The union campaign for fairness and decent pay at McDonald’s has attracted wide support from groups including War on Want. Back to the top Read Story
Members Voted No. UPs said the contract was rejected. Then Denis Taylor said it's ratified.... Read Story
Protesters gathered in the Shibuya district of Tokyo on October 2. They want McDonald's to raise its minimum wage to 1,500 yen per hour (about US$13). Read Story
Teamsters union defies “no” vote, declares UPS contract ratified The WSWS UPS Workers Newsletter is hosting an emergency call-in meeting at 5:00 pm Eastern Time on Sunday, October 7. To participate, call (872) 240-3212 and enter access code 195-681-637. Amazon workers are invited to participate! On Friday, UPS workers voted to reject a sellout contract backed by the Teamsters union and UPS management. The union, however, has announced that it considers the contract ratified and will seek to impose it in the face of mass opposition. The ballot results were released last night, with 50,248 workers (54.7 percent) voting against and 42,356 (45.74 percent) in favor. Workers at the subsidiary UPS Freight voted by 62 percent against a separate contract. Both votes follow the “no” vote by 1,300 UPS airline mechanics in Louisville, Kentucky on Wednesday, meaning all three of the Teamsters’ contracts have been defeated. The Teamsters is citing an anti-democratic clause in its constitution that provides it with virtually unchallengeable authority against the workers. The clause states that if turnout in the contract vote is less than half, a two-thirds majority of workers is required to reject the final agreement. Voter turnout on the national UPS agreement was 44 percent. The Teamsters statement cynically attempts to blame those workers who did not participate in the vote. “As we saw in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election,” it declares, “winning the popular vote does not necessarily win the election when the Constitution requires you to win the Electoral College vote. As Teamsters, we too must abide by the rules in our Constitution. Thus, the National Master UPS Agreement has been ratified.” Nervous of a wildcat strike, the Teamsters statement threatens: “You are reminded that the terms of the 2013 Agreement remain in effect, including the no strike/no lockout clause.” In effect, the union is counting those workers who did not vote as votes in favor of its agreement. No organization that was in any way accountable to workers could have such rules. Why is a two-thirds majority not required to ratify the agreement, rather than to reject it? From the beginning, the Teamsters has done everything it could to force through a sellout agreement over mass opposition. In July, workers voted overwhelmingly for strike authorization, by 93 percent, a vote that the union has simply ignored. After reaching a sellout agreement with the company, the Teamsters then dispatched local officials across the country to threaten workers with the loss of health insurance if they went on strike. The union declared that rejecting the contract would lead to a worse deal. It has spent workers’ dues money to hire the marketing firm BerlinRosen to promote its lies. And it has kept workers on the job for three months without a contract to buy time to wear down overwhelming anger over its sellout. Many workers have raised concerns about the integrity of the voting process. Several workers told the WSWS UPS Workers Newsletter yesterday, the final day of voting, that they had still not received their form in the mail providing an electronic online voting code. This is the first year that the Teamsters has used electronic voting on its contract. Now, to justify its efforts to repudiate the clear will of UPS workers, the Teamsters is claiming that it is merely upholding its constitution. However, in the vote on the last contract, the Teamsters ignored overwhelming defeats of local supplementary agreements to push through the national master contract, violating its own statutes. In that case, the Teamsters amended the constitution to override the votes at locals. The Teamsters is also refusing to call a strike at UPS Freight, where the turnout was approximately two thirds of the workforce. It has declared that it will request further negotiations with the company—and will force workers to vote again. Throughout this whole process, the Teamsters has demonstrated that it is not a workers organization, but an outfit of scabs and strike-breakers. It exists as a permanent conspiracy against the workers it claims to represent. UPS workers are faced with two alternatives. Either the union will remain in control and impose its sellout contract, which will create a new tier of lower-paid “hybrid” drivers, set a precedent for expanding the conditions of part-time work from the warehouses to deliveries, maintain poverty-level wages for part-time warehouse workers, and give a green light to the company to ramp up speedup and victimizations. Or workers can take the struggle into their own hands. The WSWS UPS Workers Newsletter urges workers follow the second course by electing rank-and-file committees in every warehouse and hub, independently of the Teamsters, to prepare an immediate nationwide walkout. These committees should draw up their own demands as the basis for a strike, including an immediate 30 percent wage increase, abolition of all tiers, the transformation of all part-time workers into full-time workers with a corresponding raise in pay and benefits, a reduction in the full-time work week from 40 to 30 hours, with no loss in pay, and workers’ control over production, line speed and delivery quotas. There is widespread support for a struggle. Heather, a UPS worker in Portland, told the WSWS last night, “I think the union will try to push it through anyway, perhaps in some kind of quiet way as to avoid pushback. If they do, people are going to get very, very angry and I would expect a strike from workers independent of the union. We definitely need to organize in a substantial way, so we can stay informed and in discussion with each other.” The votes at UPS are an expression of the growing radicalization and determination to fight in the working class across the United States and internationally. This militancy is developing in opposition to the anti-working class and pro-corporate trade unions. The “no” vote at UPS follows the strikes by US teachers in the spring of this year, which occurred through a rebellion against the national teachers unions, the nationwide strike of New Zealand nurses, and a growing strike wave by workers across Europe and the Middle East. These are the allies of the workers at UPS. Rank-and-file committees should send delegations to workers at Amazon, FedEx and the United States Postal Service, as well as to teachers, autoworkers and other sections of the working class, to organize a united struggle, including preparation for a general strike. Read Story
Twenty-three Milwaukee striking fast food workers, community supporters, and elected officials were arrested for shutting down a McDonald's on 9th and North Avenue to send a message that workers are tired of waiting for a living wage and a union. Read Story
A Multnomah County jury decided that the owner of Park Kitchen must pay employees back for six years of tips that were taken and split among kitchen staff, salaried managers and the general manager. Read Story
United Parcel Service Inc., one of the biggest employers in the U.S., is bracing for results from this week’s vote on a major labor contract that could tip the company toward a strike if it’s not approved. Read Story
UPS rank-and-file membership rejects contracts, but national Teamsters union leadership still ratifies parcel division labor deal. Read Story
In These Times features award-winning investigative reporting about corporate malfeasance and government wrongdoing, insightful analysis of national and international affairs, and sharp cultural criticism about events and ideas that matter. Read Story
In a unanimous vote yesterday, leaders representing more than 300 unions affiliated with the LA County Federation of Labor pledged to stand with educators and support our strike, if we need to walk to win a good contract. 
... Read Story
Histadrut says government is failing to act despite 30 workers, 2 passersby dying in accidents on sites so far this year... Read Story
Bernie Sanders Asks McDonald's CEO to Boost Wages to $15 an Hour; The restaurant chain’s shares (MCD) pared earlier gains following the tweet, briefly turning negative for the day before reversing course. Read Story
As the United Steelworkers negotiating committee returns to Pittsburgh, they're reporting some "significant progress" in their nearly four-month effort to come to a contract agreement with ArcelorMittal. Read Story
UberEats workers are on fast food strike with workers from JD Wetherspoon, McDonald’s and TGI Fridays.According to the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) union, the fast food strike is sa…... Read Story
McDonald’s, TGI Fridays and Deliveroo workers among those involved in walkouts... Read Story
Some Amazon workers will reportedly make less after the company’s new $15 minimum wage policy because of the elimination bonuses and stock awards.“Amazon’s…... Read Story
This morning in metals news, U.S. Steel contract talks continue with its workers, aluminum prices continued to rise today after a big surge yesterday and U.S. steel import permit applications dropped significantly in September. Read Story
Ikea locked workers into a room and forced them to watch "scaremongering" anti-union powerpoints... Read Story
Events Events Related Events Related Events Douglass Debs Dinner Sat Nov 10 EST at Chosewood Ballroom 170 guests Tomorrow EDT at The Rush Center 270 guests Tue Oct 23 EDT at Georgia Public Broadcasting 977 guests 6:30 PM EDT at We Dream In Black - National Domestic Workers Alliance 572 guests Fri Oct 19 EDT 1,447 guests Mon Oct 15 EDT at Georgia Tech 96 guests English (US) · Français (France) · Español · Português (Brasil) · Deutsch Privacy · Terms · Advertising · Ad Choices · Cookies · More Facebook © 2018 OCT 4 Fast-Food worker Strike and rally for union rights Public · Hosted by Raise Up and Atlanta Jobs with Justice Interested clock Thursday, October 4, 2018 at 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDT 8 hours ago pin 912 Martin Luther King Jr Dr NW, Atlanta, GA 30314-3625, United States Show Map 17 Went · 30 Interested Share this event with your friends Read Story
They thought they were fired. The company said they weren't. A union helped them protest. They went back to work. Read Story
A strike would impact Tolko operations in both Quesnel and Williams Lake, as well as the West Fraser planer operation in the Lake City, Dunkley Lumber and other operations in Prince George, Houston…... Read Story
Nearly 2,500 Marriott hotel workers at seven downtown San Francisco properties walked off their jobs, threatening to disrupt the city’s fall conventions. Read Story
While T-Mobile and Sprint have touted the various benefits of a merger, the CWA union is rallying in an effort to prevent jobs losses of up to 28,000. Read Story
Protesting workers may need to be extra cautious about whose hand they’re trying to force in the wake of a recent NLRB ruling that could affect labor advocacy in a number of industries. Read Story
NEW YORK, N.Y.—With a Senate vote on confirming federal appeals-court judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court looming within as little as 24 hours, about 150 lawyers and legal staff held a last-minute protest in Foley Square during the courts’ lunch-hour recess Oct. 4. Kavanaugh on the Court, Legal Services Staff Association President Sonja Shield told LaborPress, would be “devastating” for the low-income New Yorkers her members represent in criminal and civil cases. On issues ranging from labor to abortion rights, she says, “he’s consistently ruled against the underdog.” The rally was one of five lunch-hour demonstrations organized by three legal unions: the LSSA, an affiliate of United Auto Workers Local 2320, which represents both lawyers and support staff at Legal Services NYC and Mobilization for Justice; the Association of Legal Aid Attorneys, UAW Local 2325; and 1199SEIU, which represents Legal Aid Society staff such as paralegals and process servers. The others took place outside Housing Court in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens, and at Criminal Court in Staten Island. “We cannot stand idly by,” Legal Services attorney Brian Sullivan told the mostly female crowd in Foley Square. “This would negatively affect the rights of our clients for decades to come. No to misogynist violence.” The intense opposition to Kavanaugh came from three places: The belief that he would cement a majority of far-right ideologues on the Supreme Court; the outrage after Christine Blasey Ford and other women accused him of sexually assaulting and harassing them; and the feeling that the Trump administration and Senate Republicans are rushing to get him on the court without adequate debate because of the risk that the Democrats might win a Senate majority in November. Along with [Justice Neil] Gorsuch,[Brett Kavanaugh] is the ideal of a Koch brothers judge. He’ll be anti-labor and anti-worker. — Legal Aid lawyer Thomas Curtis. “It’s horrifying to see how intent the far right is on ramming him through with no regard for truth or process,” Shield says. “The White House obstructed any meaningful inquiry.” The FBI probe into Ford’s allegations is a “sham,” she charges: It hasn’t interviewed either Ford or Kavanaugh, the two principal figures involved. “Along with [Justice Neil] Gorsuch, he’s the ideal of a Koch brothers judge,” says Legal Aid lawyer Thomas Curtis. “He’ll be anti-labor and anti-worker.” “Even before Dr. Ford came forward, it was clear that Kavanaugh was an ideologue perfectly tailored to carry out President Donald Trump’s agenda,” Shield said in a statement released by organizers. Association of Legal Aid Attorneys President Deborah Wright said the group stands against both “Judge Kavanaugh’s heinous acts and also against his jurisprudence, which demonstrates a consistent disregard for the rights and humanity of women, workers, people of color, and the environment.” On labor issues, Shield says Kavanaugh’s record shows that “he sides with employers over employees.” She cites his 2008 dissent in Agri Processor Co. v. National Labor Relations Board, in which Kavanaugh argued that a Brooklyn kosher-meat wholesaler had the right to refuse to bargain with the United Food and Commercial Workers because the union election had been “tainted” by undocumented immigrants voting—and because they couldn’t legally work there, they couldn’t be considered legitimate employees (The Supreme Court had ruled in 18984 that they could vote in union elections). The sexual-assault accusations, however, were the largest source of outrage, with protesters carrying signs such as “We Believe Women” and chanting, “Believe the survivor, not the sniveling liar.” Legal Aid lawyer Marianne Allegro says she found Ford’s testimony about the alleged attack before the Senate Judiciary Committee “very credible,” while Kavanaugh’s “was horrific.” Sullivan says the judge’s angry behavior reminded him of “a petulant, entitled child.” “We’ve got to stop this insane process any way we can,” says Allegro. “We can stop the confirmation of this depraved man who is so unfit.” Kavanaugh Supreme Cout Read Story
NEW YORK (AP) — Some 2,000 postdoctoral researchers and associate research scientists at Columbia University have voted for representation... Read Story
(CALIFORNIA) – Port truck drivers for XPO Logistics Inc. who are on strike held rallies in Los Angeles and San Diego and demanded the company end the rampant day-to-day abuse of drivers.The actions come on the heels of a breaking victory as the California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement recognized... Read Story