PSLabor News

PSLabor News

T-Mobile and Sprint say they've reached an agreement to combine into a new company that would reshape the U.S.wireless landscape by reducing it to three major cellphone providers...
Read Story
Workers at a casino hotel west of the Las Vegas Strip have voted to unionize through a secret-ballot election supervised by the National Labor Relations Board...
Read Story
" />
By David Amoruso
At 6’4” Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran literally was a towering figure.But to those who knew him in the American underworld, he was even taller…...
Read Story
The Iowa Democrats' governing board will have a lot more labor members on it following the elections at district conventions on Saturday.
Read Story
UAW filed complaint with National Labor Relations Board NLRB alleging car manufacturer Tesla illegally terminated employees support unions organizing efforts...
Read Story
NLRB found terminations for email complaints violated Section 8a1 of NLRA, which prohibits employers from interfering, restraining, or coercing employees in exercise of rights.
Read Story
WASHINGTON — Americans overwhelmingly believe teachers don't make enough money, and half say they'd support paying higher taxes to give educators a raise. The findings ...
Read Story
Allison Feldstein, Vice Managing Partner of the Firm’s Pittsburgh Office, presents a Lawline Webcast titled “The Restaurant Industry: Labor & Employment Litigation Du Jour” on May 7. Allison will cover an overview of recent labor and employment litigation in the restaurant industry. Specifically, she will focus on discrimination and harassment, NLRB decisions, and wage and hour issues. For more information, and to register, click here.
Read Story
US wireless operators Sprint and T-Mobile will form a new company and push development of a super-fast 5G network, the heads of both firms said Sunday.
Read Story
Randi Weingarten will be holding a news conference late Monday morning next to the state Capitol and also will speak at a rally.
Read Story
Bad decisions by the parent company and a rapidly changing retail grocery landscape are key reasons why Minnesota-based Supervalu is selling a local chain.
Read Story
The coalition wants a new board dedicated to protecting ride-hailing company drivers.
Read Story
A tight labor market forces BNSF and Union Pacific to dangle big incentives from Missouri to Oregon.
Read Story
On Friday, Jan. 20, as Donald Trump was being sworn in as president, workers in Minnesota went on strike. They were cleaning staff at Kimco, an Atlanta-based company with 7,200 employees nationwide, that cleans Home Depot stores.
Read Story
The National Labor Relations Board welcomes Trump Appointee John Ring and many Obama era precdents are in danger, however, Joint Employer Test remains.
Read Story
PARIS, April 29 (Reuters) - France's CFDT union on Sunday urged striking Air France workers to accept a management pay offer, blaming the airline's main...
Read Story
The teachers' strikes are spreading...
Read Story
This vital question has not been examined fully by the courts with regard to the duty to bargain the terms and conditions of employment in light of the Title IX interim guidance set forth in September 2017.
Read Story
Workplace bullying and harassment part of annual ceremony...
Read Story
A bargaining order is an extreme form of relief and requires careful consideration of whether circumstances render such an order inappropriate Second Circuit explained in Novelis Corp. v. NLRB.
Read Story
WASHINGTON -- Earlier this month, news came out that 50 Tampa Bay Times employees would face a fate typically reserved for factory workers and steel mill operators: Losing their jobs in a trade dispute.
Read Story
A pair of Democrats asked the labor board April 25 to assure them the agency won’t do an end run around Congress and freeze funding as part of the White House’s reported attempt to claw back billions from the spending bill passed last month.
Read Story
The misbehaviour by banks is so extensive and so shocking it’s likely to do lasting damage to the credibility of the whole of big business and its lobby groups.
Read Story
In These Times features award-winning investigative reporting about corporate malfeasance and government wrongdoing, insightful analysis of national and international affairs, and sharp cultural criticism about events and ideas that matter.
Read Story
So Ford is getting out of the sedan business in North America. Not a big surprise.
Read Story
AUXVASSE — Despite the National Labor Relations Board's ruling, the fight over the Auxvasse Dollar General store workers' vote to unionize might not be over.
Read Story
Tax incentives for companies making substantial capital improvements using Illinois construction labor ...
Read Story
In These Times features award-winning investigative reporting about corporate malfeasance and government wrongdoing, insightful analysis of national and international affairs, and sharp cultural criticism about events and ideas that matter.
Read Story
SAN FRANCISCO — Well paid and in high demand, it would appear that engineers in Silicon Valley have...
Read Story
We, two public school teachers in Los Angeles, made a choice to teach at Alliance College-Ready Public Schools, the largest public charter network in Los Angeles. It was a deliberate decision rooted in our desire to make a life-changing difference in children’s lives, particularly children from...
Read Story
JUST 11 of 120,000 McDonald’s staff want to take part in the Labour-backed plot to close the restaurant. Even a rave hosted by the Shadow Chancellor failed to rescue the May 1 walkout. The protest was over zero-hours contracts despite eight in ten workers preferring flexible contracts when the...
Read Story
TEACHERS WALK OUT IN ARIZONA, COLORADO: "Thousands of teachers in Arizona and Colorado walked out of their classrooms on Thursday to demand more funding for public schools, the latest surge of a teacher protest movement that has already swept through three states and is spreading quickly to others,"...
Read Story
Teachers are riding a wave of national support as the fight for better pay.
Read Story
Despite a warning that they were unwelcome, Moses Taylor Hospital nurses showed up to clock in for the 7 a.m. shift Thursday, the time their strike officially ended. Security stopped most of them before they made it through the door.
Read Story
We’ve made great progress, but the Trump administration is intent on rolling back protections and favoring industry interests over the public interest...
Read Story
Twelve photos that show the evolution of the U.S. labor movement from the early 1900s to today.
Read Story
Labor unrest harmed Democrats in the 1960s and 1970s. This time the GOP might be the loser.
Read Story
With a U.S. Supreme Court decision due in June in the anti-union Janus v. AFSCME case, UFT members should brace for a campaign by right-wing forces looking to degrade the value of union membership, UFT President Michael Mulgrew recently told union delegates.
Read Story
Mike Antonucci’s Union Report appears Wednesdays; see the full archive Las Vegas teachers, fed up with how their dues are being spent, voted overwhelmingly late Wednesday to cut all ties with their state and national parent unions.
Read Story
Health-care, service, technical and research workers are uniting to strike at all University of California locations May 7-9, union leaders announced Friday, as nurses and other health-care professionals join the labor action initiated by UC service and patient-care workers.
Read Story
Becker's Hospital Review reported on the following events related to hospital-union relationships — including protests, legal issues and elections — since April 13.
Read Story
Tens of thousands of union workers at University of California hospitals and college campuses will strike next month, according to The Sacramento Bee.
Read Story
Hundreds of AT&T workers are rallying for higher wages and protesting the outsourcing of jobs today outside of the telecommunications giant's...
Read Story
In recent Labor Notes blog posts, Chris Brooks and Steve Downs have debated whether public sector unions faced with a “right-to-work” or open-shop situation should seek statewide legislation that would end mandatory exclusive representation. An open shop means workers are not obligated to make payments to the union. Exclusive representation means that for a given bargaining unit, only one union at a time can be officially recognized—and this union is obliged to represent all the workers, even those who don’t pay. Brooks describes how right-to-work Tennessee’s elimination of exclusive representation in its collective-bargaining law for educators led to competition from pro-corporate “associations” of educators. Downs counters that Brooks is overgeneralizing from his experience, and that public sector unions in highly unionized states like New York and New Jersey who lose the ability to collect “fair-share” payments from all workers should “make quitters pay” by refusing to represent them in grievances or look out for their interests in collective bargaining. My union, United Electrical Workers (UE), covers workplaces that have recently become open-shop and others that have always been open-shop. Our experiences suggest that the question of giving up exclusive representation is a distraction. Instead, it’s in the best interests of union members to build maximum unity against the boss, in order to extract the best possible conditions for all workers—regardless of whether they are union members or not. WISCONSIN: ‘TAKING FOOD OFF YOUR KITCHEN TABLE’ Two UE locals in Wisconsin recently bargained their first contracts under the state’s 2015 right-to-work law. In each case local leaders understood that, in order to maintain membership under the new contract, they would have to put on a real fight that involved everyone, so that everyone in the shop understood the union’s value. Local 1107 in Necedah responded to the threat of impending open shop by pulling out all the stops to reverse a divisive two-tier wage scale that had been imposed on members during the 2009 downturn in the auto-parts business. This meant months of preparation in the shop and at membership meetings, keeping members regularly informed of what was happening at the bargaining table. T-shirt days, creative protests involving penny jars and Legos, and rallies and marches in the shop and at the bargaining location united older and younger workers, many of whom had never participated in a rally before. These actions produced a new contract which will eliminate the two-tier system over the life of the contract, and includes no rollback of union rights other than the legally-mandated elimination of union shop language. Local leaders at Local 1121 in La Crosse, which represents workers at an industrial laundry, knew that the looming threat of open shop meant they needed to ratchet up the struggle against the boss and make an extra effort to include all workers, not just the bargaining committee or elected leadership. So the local began its contract negotiations with a potluck meal and discussion demands at the Hmong Community Center, with interpretation, to ensure that the large number of Hmong workers in the shop were united with other workers around their shared concerns and what demands to bring to the company. A series of escalating actions culminated in a 45-minute walkout—the first in the local’s 20-year history—joined by every single worker in the shop. At the contract ratification meetings, union leaders emphasized that the victory was due to members’ unity—and that to maintain the gains in the contracts, they would need to maintain that unity, including by continuing as union members. “If someone tries to drop their membership in the union, they are trying to take food off of your kitchen table,” is how UE Western Region President Carl Rosen put it. This moral persuasion, based on an appreciation of the importance of unity in order to win gains for all, has been successful. Both locals have retained almost 100 percent membership. IOWA: THE BENEFITS OF LEGITIMACY I got my own start in the labor movement a little over two decades ago, organizing with my fellow graduate employees at the University of Iowa to form UE Local 896. Iowa was a right-to-work state, but at the time had a fairly robust public-sector collective bargaining law (later eviscerated by Republicans in 2017). Although we won a representation election in our diverse and far-flung bargaining unit of 2,600 workers, and built a powerful and activist local that won significant wage increases and health care improvements in our first contract, we were never able to reach majority membership. As a newly established local in an institution where we potentially had to compete for legitimacy with the Graduate Student Senate, the benefits of exclusive representation to our own members far outweighed the costs of having to represent non-dues-payers. Had we been relieved of the “burden” of exclusive representation, the university administration almost certainly would have used that to give higher wages, better jobs, and other preferential treatment to individuals who did not join the union—thus creating an even stronger incentive for people to not join the union than just saving on their dues. NORTH CAROLINA: A ‘MEMBERS-ONLY’ UNION FIGHTS FOR ALL WORKERS The workers at the Cummins Engines plant in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, who are members of a Workers Unity Committee affiliated with UE Local 150, have been fighting for justice at work through their “pre-majority” or “members-only” union for over 25 years. In fact, they were one of the primary case studies in a 2015 report on members-only unions by the progressive Century Foundation. Their experiences suggest that even without exclusive representation, unions should seek to act on behalf of all workers and prove the benefits of collective participation in struggle. In 2004, the CDC Workers Unity Committee launched a lawsuit because, in 2002, Cummins had only paid workers 70 percent of what was due to them under the company’s bonus plans. The workers decided not to file it as a class-action lawsuit—in some ways the equivalent of exclusive representation, as all workers in the “class” would have benefited from a successful settlement. Instead, to demonstrate the importance of worker participation in collective struggle, they formed a CDC Workers Unity Legal Fund. Workers who joined as plaintiffs were asked to pay $25 each—not only to offset the cost of the lawsuit but also, more importantly, to commit to collective action. Those who joined the Legal Fund also became associate members of the union; a number of them later joined as full members. The union used the lawsuit to build organization. Leaders sorted the 202 workers who joined the lawsuit into 10 areas of the plant; in each area they designated lawsuit “communicators” who later became union stewards. When the union was required to go to mediation prior to court, the members of the Legal Fund elected a 12-member negotiating committee. At the time, most Legal Fund members, and even a majority of the 30 workers nominated, were not full union members. However, the 12 workers who were elected to the negotiating committee were all full members and union leaders, which reinforced the union’s mandate as a legitimate representative of the whole workforce. In July 2006, the workers won a summary judgment in their favor. Under the terms of the suit, the company was only legally obligated to make payments to the 202 workers who had joined the suit as plaintiffs. However, even though they had no legal obligation to, the union agitated successfully for the company to make the payout—the lost 30 percent plus 8 percent interest—to all workers who had been employed at the plant in 2002. This action sent the message that the union fights on behalf of all workers, not just its own members, and resulted in both membership growth and increased prestige for the union in the plant, with many previously anti-union workers thanking and congratulating UE members. Unions are, or should be, organizations of the working class. Workers who are not class-conscious enough to choose to pay union dues are still members of the working class, and while we can and in some cases should shame freeloaders, we should not stop bargaining for and representing the whole class. Jonathan Kissam is the UE Communications Director.
Read Story
The University of California’s largest employee union announced that 25,000 workers will go on strike for three days starting on May 7 to protest stalled contract negotiations and alleged racial and gender disparities.
Read Story
The Labor Relations blog is managed by the labor law attorneys at Barnes & Thornburg. The blog aims to be a source for news, analysis, and commentary on traditional labor legal issues, including news related to the NLRB and a variety of state issues.
Read Story
Registered nurses at First Hospital in Kingston and Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton went on strike on Wednesday in the rain for what was intended to be one day.Hospital officials, however, confirmed later Wednesday that they will be locked out for five...
Read Story
[Dec. 19, 2017] POMONA, Calif. – Healthcare workers filed a municipal ballot initiative today for the November 2018 election that would improve patient care at hospitals in the City of Pomona, Calif. by increasing hours for housekeeping staff until the number of hospital-acquired infections is reduced. “For three years in a row, more and more patients at Pomona Valley Hospital have been exposed to potentially life-threatening infections at the facility,” said Danny Hernandez, a housekeeper at Pomona Valley Hospital. “The goal of this ballot initiative is to hold hospitals accountable and make sure they spend their money on improving patient care and fighting dangerous outbreaks.” The ballot initiative would affect Casa Colina Hospital and Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. If either facility’s rates for two hospital-acquired infections are worse than the national standard, they would be required to increase housekeeping staff hours by 20 percent until the hospital meets national benchmarks for three continuous years. To retain quality employees, the ballot measure would also increase the hospitals’ minimum wage to $18 an hour in January 2019. Organizers need to collect the signatures of approximately 6,458 registered Pomona voters to qualify the measure for the Nov. 6, 2018 election. From Jan. 1, 2016 through Dec. 31, 2016, Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center reported 122 cases of patients acquiring Clostridium difficile (C. diff.), a contagious infection that causes severe diarrhea, fever and nausea. Pomona Valley Hospital reported 97 such infections in 2015, and 82 cases in 2014. As a result, Pomona Valley Hospital was worse than the national standard in preventing patients from acquiring C. diff infections for three years in a row, raising concerns about hospital executives’ failure to address the problem. Data from Casa Colina Hospital is not publicly available. Pomona Valley Hospital workers have previously raised concerns with management regarding a lack of training and staffing that they believe contributed to patient infections, and affect their own safety. More than 1,100 employees at Pomona Valley Hospital are members of SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West (SEIU-UHW). Paid for by Service Employees International Union United Healthcare Workers West Political Issues Committee, 560 Thomas L. Berkley Way, Oakland, CA 94612.
Read Story
They don’t have a union and it’s illegal for them to strike. So these workers are using direct action to get what they need.
Read Story