PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Trump’s National Labor Relations Board will soon decide the fate of reproductive rights workers in the Rocky Mountains Read Story
USW: Striking Miners Will Rally Friday at Hecla Headquarters   [18-July-2018]... Read Story
New York City will pay its nurses and midwives over $20 million to settle a gender discrimination lawsuit, the U.S. Attorney of the Eastern District of New York announced Wednesday. Read Story
Article Date: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 The County of Sacramento and the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 39, which represents the Water Quality/Stationary Engineers Unit, have reached a tentative agreement for a three-year contract. The agreement is pending ratification by Local 39 membership. The agreement is expected to go to the Board of Supervisors on July 24, 2018. The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Local 146 also reached a three-year tentative agreement with the County. AFSCME membership has ratified the agreement and it will go to the Board of Supervisors for approval on July 24, 2018. Local 39 and AFSCME bargaining units represent roughly 500 employees each of the County’s approximately 12,000 employees. The Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 2015, which represents the In Home Supportive Services employees previously reached an agreement which was approved by the Board of Supervisors on July 17, 2018.  In addition, the County has reached agreements with 13 other bargaining units and negotiations are in progress with the 13 remaining bargaining units. Each of the County’s agreements are for three ​years along with an unrepresented employees pay plan that went into effect July 1, 2018. To date, the County has agreements with the following bargaining units: 002/004 (SCALE): Law Enforcement Support 003 (DSA): Deputy Sheriffs 006 (Local 39): Operations & Maintenance 010 (SCPAA): Accountants 013/014 (EMSSC): Environmental Management Specialists  Sacramento County 019 (SCPA): Probation Non-Supervisory 026 (ETTI): Engineering Technicians and Technical Inspectors 027 (UAPD): Physicians and Dentists 028 (UPEC): Information Technology Systems 029 (LEMA): Law Enforcement Management Association 034 (SCAPA): Sacramento County Administrative Professionals Association Sacramento County has a total of 30 bargaining units. Read Story
By Christian Schappel To help employers craft handbooks that don’t violate the National Labor Relations Act, the National Labor Relations Board has issued a compilation of rules it has found to be illegal — and rewritten them to illustrate how they can comply with the law. Read Story
EDITOR'S NOTE: The Kentucky State AFL-CIO and Teamsters Local 89 are challenging the constitutionality of Kentucky's "right to work" law in court. A breadth of national evidence shows why Missouri voters should reject RTW lawBy JANELLE JONES and HEIDI SHIERHOLZ... Read Story
A potential strike by nurses at Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children's Hospital looms ever closer as contract negotiations appear to have stalled. Read Story
A labor board judge July 18 rejected an agreement proposed by McDonald’s Corp. to settle a closely watched dispute over union rights and pay in a 42-page opinion that was an effective rebuke of the fast-food giant’s offer. Read Story
The Lagos headquarters of ExxonMobil has been shut down by the company’s workers’ unions over the sacking of 860 spy police without entitlement.... Read Story
The workers who blew the whistle on Wells Fargo have joined with other bank employees to win a better life for themselves and a safer economy for the nation. Read Story
The two sides will meet July 24 to resume negotiations over wages and staffing at the Burlington hospital. Nurses went on strike for 48 hours last week. Read Story
Get free insurance quotes. Get Updates on Auto insurance, Health insurance, Travel, Renters, Business insurance, car insurance and all types of insurances. Read Story
WASHINGTON (AP) - Leaders of the Washington Metro's largest union have met with Metro officials in the first meeting since workers overwhelmingly voted to... Read Story
In These Times features award-winning investigative reporting about corporate malfeasance and government wrongdoing, insightful analysis of national and international affairs, and sharp cultural criticism about events and ideas that matter. Read Story
r/pittsburgh: Community curated front page of Pittsburgh's place on the internet.[Share](/r/pittsburgh/submit) news, events, and thoughts with/about the Pittsburgh community. Read Story
UFCW Canada Local 401 members working at Mountain Creek Farms in Calgary have ratified a new collective agreement that provides wage increases, improved bereavement leave, and more. Read Story
Many Giant Eagle employees will get a pay raise following the end of a long contract negotiation between the company and United Food and Commercial ... Read Story
HOLLY LINDSEY, 52, HAS BEEN A LICENSED HOME CHILD-CARE PROVIDER FOR 22 YEARS AND A UNION MEMBER FOR 12.She joined SEIU 925 when the local formed in 2006. Read Story
Third BCCP Conference and Policy Forum Focusing on regulatory challenges in digital markets, in particular trust online, the third annual Conference and Policy Forum of the Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies (BCCP) was held in Berlin on June 8th, 2018. Touching upon an issue at the forefront of current European and US policy debates, around 100 participants, including academics from law and economics, policy makers, professionals, BCCP Fellows, and the interested public came together at the headquarters of the Leibniz Association. The tremendous growth of digital transactions has profoundly affected the way we interact, opening vast opportunities to improve our lives. Consumers have benefited from an unprecedented proliferation of new services and products. At the same time, consumers often must process large amounts of imperfect information regarding the products they purchase and services they use. Even more, for many services consumers need to share highly personal information. Being able to both rely on third party information as well as safely share personal data not only requires a well-designed legal framework and active enforcement. Consumers must trust (potentially dominant) platforms, providers of goods and services, as well as individuals they interact with online. The conference panellists and participants discussed how policymakers, regulators and online platforms can foster trust and protect consumer privacy and their personal data. Session reviews In the opening policy roundtable about the Digital Single Market and consumer trust, panelists Stacy Feuer (US Federal Trade Commission), Juhan Lepassaar (European Commission), and moderator Ludwig Siegele (The Economist) engaged in a lively discussion about current and potential policy measures to protect consumer privacy and foster online trust. With the increasing relevance of online influencers, regulation of influencer marketing similar to the regulation of traditional advertising is required. In particular, disclosure of compensation of online influencers for reviews or recommendations is necessary to prevent deception of consumers. Regarding consumer privacy protection, the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) started a global debate about privacy protection in the digital era that was previously dormant. In the EU, the project of the Digital Single Market aims to enable the free movement of goods and services in the digital space, providing the underlying infrastructure, and harmonizing national advances in e-government. Watch the presentations and discussion of the policy roundtable on the Digital Single Market and consumer trust: In the first afternoon session, Ari Ezra Waldman (New York Law School) and Glen Weyl (Microsoft Research and Yale University) presented their research on user data sharing, trust and incentives. Nowadays many online services rely on the sharing of user-generated data. In this context, the so called privacy paradox alludes to the finding that while consumers state that they care about their privacy, they still provide substantial personal information and data to online services. However, as Ari Ezra Waldman argued, this privacy paradox exists because companies manipulate user behaviour online through deliberate platform design choices that lull consumers into a false sense of trust and make them believe that they are in control over their personal information. Glen Weyl on the other hand, argued for a shift from regarding “data as capital” to regarding “data as labor”. According to him, artificial intelligence is just a new form of production function of tech companies that uses data as input. As users provide the necessary data that is then used as an input in order to develop new sophisticated products and services, these users should consequently be paid by the companies for the provision of this data. The two talks where followed by a vivid discussion moderated by Dorothea Kübler (WZB Berlin Social Science Center and Technical University Berlin) on how data labor unions could solve the issue of design choices creating a fake sense of trust on online platforms. Watch the presentations and discussion of the panel on User Data Sharing: Trust and Incentives: In the second afternoon session, Michael Luca (Harvard Business School), Steve Tadelis (UC Berkeley), and moderator Roland Strausz (HU Berlin) discussed the role of reputation and trust in online platforms. The design of reputation systems on online platforms can lead to unintended negative consequences. For example, including a photo and the name on the peer-to-peer rental platform Airbnb is supposed to decrease anonymity and foster trust but allows for racial discrimination of hosts with regards to potential guests. Research presented by Michael Luca showed that racial discrimination plays a role on Airbnb in the US. He suggested platforms should therefore try to maximize the value of reputation systems while minimizing unintended consequences. Further, online reputation systems often face three challenges: grade inflation, the public good problem, and the cold start problem. Steve Tadelis suggested several ways in which platforms could use information available to them to generate more informative reputation measures. Using data from eBay, he showed that these measures are good predictors of the likelihood of consumers to return to eBay after a transaction. Watch the presentations and discussion of the panel on reputation and trust on online platforms: The conference program and further information about the speakers can be found at the conference website. Back Read Story
The U.S. Commerce Department has asked automakers to reveal some of their most closely held secrets as part of its investigation of whether tariffs on imported cars and components are needed to safeguard national security. Read Story
In yet another example of an irresponsible, undemocratic, unprecedented attempt to wipe out labor unions from the United States, the Trump administration has ordered federal agencies across the country to begin implementing the three controversial executive orders to obstruct our work fighting... Read Story
A showdown looms in Washington now that Metro’s largest union has overwhelmingly authorized a potential transit system strike, just as thousands of tourists arrive in the nation’s capital for this... Read Story
Dr. Oetker employees in London, Ontario voted Union Yes to joining UFCW Local 175 after a five-month drive to bring the Union benefit to their work lives. Read Story
‘This is a president whose main export is disruption,’ argued Washington, D.C.lawyer Scotty Greenwood, CEO of the Canada America Business Council... Read Story