PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Nurses' union, Michigan Medicine reach tentative agreement Detroit Free Press Published 3:12 PM EDT Sep 29, 2018 The University of Michigan Hospital system on the University of Michigan central campus in Ann Arbor on Wed., June 13, 2018. Kimberly P. Mitchell, Detroit Free Press A nurses' union that authorized a strike earlier this month has reached a tentative deal with Michigan Medicine, the medical arm of the University of Michigan, according to a joint announcement Saturday.  The University of Michigan Professional Nurses Council, which voted to approve a strike on Sept. 17, now has plans for a three-year contract agreement with Michigan Medicine.  Details of the agreement will be discussed at upcoming union meetings, and nurses will decide whether to approve the deal through a ratification vote "in the coming weeks," according to the news release.  More than 94 percent of the 4,000 union members had approved plans for a three-day work stoppage, citing claims of U-M's failure to negotiate in good faith, discrimination against union members and shift changes with no notification as basis for its strike approval. Saturday's agreement was reached before a strike occurred.  "Our bargaining team is recommending this agreement because it will allow nurses to continue to provide world-class care," said Katie Oppenheim, chair of the Michigan Nurses Association, in the news release. "We are proud of our nurses and their ongoing dedication to patients." Mary Masson, a Michigan Medicine spokeswoman, had previously said that the organization would take legal action, as it's illegal for public employees to strike. Also, Michigan Medicine had been preparing plans to hire and train temporary nurses in case of a strike, as the "most critically ill patients in the state come to Michigan medicine."  Dr. David Spahlinger, president of the University of Michigan Health System and executive vice dean for clinical affairs of the U-M Medical School, said in Saturday's news release that they're pleased to have reached the tentative agreement.  “Reaching a resolution is the best possible outcome for our hospital employees, our patients and our community,” he said Related: Nurses confront University of Michigan leaders as strike looms Nurses file lawsuit against U-M health system in midst of strike vote The University of Michigan Professional Nurses Council represents 5,700 nurses at U-M hospitals and other health care facilities. Free Press reporter Marc Daalder contributed. Contact reporter Omar Abdel-Baqui: 313-222-2514 or oabdel-baqui@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @omarabdelb Published 3:12 PM EDT Sep 29, 2018 Read Story
A strike by ground staff in the summer was averted. Read Story
Pittsburgh, PA - Steelworkers represented by United Steelworkers (USW) are making preparations to strike against ArcelorMittal, the world’s largest... Read Story
The gas company is facing a worker shortage in its bid to hire 1,300 people to assist in cleanup work in the Merrimack Valley.... Read Story
“Nurses unions are split on the initiative. The Massachusetts Nurses Association has endorsed it.The larger American Nurses Association opposes it.” This line in a recent news story about Senator …... Read Story
The action targets XPO Logistics Inc. and NFI Industries and marks the 16th strike mounted by the Teamsters union in recent years among nonunion workers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, according to the labor group. Read Story
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Employees of SAQ stores and offices have a new 18-day strike mandate to be used at the right time, their union revealed following a general meeting held in Montreal on Friday night. Read Story
It’s the day after Payday Folks, we had a little too much fun last night at our fundraiser. Greetings from the Mt Pleasant Public Library in the heart of Duke Ellington’s hometown Washington D.C, where Melk is recovering from an epic blowout... Read Story
Nigeria:Workers' unions launch indefinite nationwide strike... Read Story
The letter claims they are offering striking workers more than living wage, union stalling process... Read Story
U.S Steelworkers employed by ArcelorMittal, the world's leading integrated steel and mining company, have authorized a strike after unsuccessful contract... Read Story
Workers at four more Chicago hotels approved a new contract that will end a three-week long strike over wages and off-season benefits. Read Story
A labor group on Friday said the reason workers could barely make ends meet was the real value of their wages now could only buy products at their 2017 price levels. Read Story
The WEA union’s decision to target districts with teacher strikes just as the school year was starting disrupted the education of thousands of public education students, although teachers at the state’s charter public schools did not strike. As a result of union strike demands, many districts ended up putting their school budgets into deficit. This summer, officials at 250 (out of 295) school districts negotiated new teacher contracts.  As a pressure tactic, executives at the powerful WEA union targeted 29 school districts with strikes, even though teachers strikes are not permitted under state law.  Of these, 15 districts were hit with strikes, putting some 164,000 students out of school.  In all, the education of one in three children were affected by actual or threatened strike action this year. Political conflict is a central part of Washington state’s education system.  Federal data shows a child’s education in Washington is more likely to be disrupted by union strike action than in any other state. The disruptions come at a time of record increases in school budgets.  The legislature passed a large property tax increase and added $7.3 billion to education spending over the next four years.  This year spending averages $15,000 per student, more than the tuition at most private schools. In King County, for example, property taxes have increased an average of 17%, adding $800 in tax on a median-valued home.  That burden falls hardest on those least able to pay; the poor, the young, immigrant households, and the elderly living on a fixed income. Still, rising union demands and strike action have put many school budgets into deficit, meaning lawmakers will likely be pressed to provide a bailout by raising taxes again when they meet in January. Change in the system may be coming, however.  Currently 3,500 children attend charter public schools.  During the recent strikes none of their teachers walked out.  Charters are popular and most have long waiting lists, as parents seek alternatives to traditional schools in their areas that are not working. Further, the U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that all public school teachers have a fundamental right to work, meaning they can refuse to strike, and even leave their union altogether, without being fired.  Teacher pay is at record highs, many make over $80,000 a year, so many educators see no need to harm student learning by joining a union walk-out. These two trends – greater family choice in education, and rising professionalism and autonomy among teachers – will continue to weaken the WEA union’s grip on local schools.  That’s a good thing.  As union power wanes, it will reduce conflict in the system.  That in turn will help parents, teachers and administrators work together collaboratively to make sure every child has access to a good public education. Read Story