PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. Read Story
Elon Musk has said he is ‘neutral’ about a union but former employees blame their firing on their efforts to organize while current workers say a ‘culture of fear’ persists Read Story
With the start of the new school year, many NYSUT local unions are successfully engaging new members with personal conversations, videos, presentations, posters and music at back-to-school membership sign-up events. Read Story
A Cowlitz County Superior Court judge has ordered Longview teachers back to work. Read Story
Many of us have stopped by a Rite Aid for some aspirin, band aids or maybe a soda and chips, but how many of us think about the workers behind the counter? Usually we get what we need and out the door we go. Read Story
Workers at a Target in Huntington Station, N.Y., rejected union representation in voting that concluded Sept. 8, a company spokesperson told Bloomberg Law. Read Story
Wages for many low- and middle-income workers have remained relatively stagnant despite a strong economy and low unemployment. Why is that? And what should business leaders—and the HR professionals who advise them—be doing about it? Read Story
Alcoa and Canada's United Steelworkers union are awaiting a call from a special mediator to return to the bargaining table in hopes of ending an eight month lockout at the 450,000 mt/year Aluminerie d... Read Story
The United Steelworkers said Friday that labor negotiations with ArcelorMittal have stalled on the back of health care and wage proposals. Read Story
The National Labor Relations Board has upheld an Administrative Law Judge’s decision to invalidate 11 severance agreements that provided payments to employees laid off shortly after an election in violation of the National Labor Relations Act. Read Story
Legal action filed in state court after UAW officials collected tens of thousands of dollars in payments in violation of state law, and illegally required workers to join union Flint, MI (September 6, 2018) – A group of workers filed a class-action lawsuit in Michigan state court against United Auto Workers (UAW) Local 708 and STAT Emergency Medical Services to indicate their rights under the state Right to Work law that makes union membership and dues payments strictly voluntary. The workers filed the lawsuit, which seeks refunds of over $25,000 in illegally seized union dues and fees, with free legal aid from the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation. The lawsuit asks for injunctive relief and the return of three years of dues and fees that were collected by UAW officials in violation of Michigan’s Right to Work law for private sector workers. As the complaint notes, in addition to the illegal forced dues, the workers have been required to be UAW members and dues were automatically deducted from their paychecks without their authorization, in violation of the law. Both the required membership and automatic deduction policies violate state labor law. Michigan’s Right to Work law, which was enacted in 2013, protects workers’ choice by outlawing mandatory union membership and union payments as a condition of employment. The forced-dues monopoly contract was put in place by the UAW in 2015, more than two years after Michigan’s Right to Work protections came into effect. The lawsuit seeks refunds of all illegal dues collected under that contract. In addition to the class action suit, two of the workers filed federal unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) against the UAW and their employer, STAT Emergency Medical Services. The federal charges detail the automatic dues deduction despite the lack of a check-off authorization, which violates sections of the National Labor Relations Act. “Rather than work to earn the voluntary support of rank-and-file workers, union officials are blatantly violating longstanding federal and state law to extract dues from workers,” said Mark Mix, President of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation. “Whether or not a state has Right to Work protections, workers and the Foundation will continue to remain vigilant to ensure that employees’ legal rights are not ignored by Big Labor officials.” The National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation is a nonprofit, charitable organization providing free legal aid to employees whose human or civil rights have been violated by compulsory unionism abuses. The Foundation, which can be contacted toll-free at 1-800-336-3600, assists thousands of employees in more than 250 cases nationwide per year. Read Story
OBJECTCOLUMBUS — The party of organized labor in this state has run into a little labor friction of its own as the Ohio Democratic Party negotiates its first contract with a fledgling union representing about 80 on-the-ground campaign workers. The Washington-based Campaign Workers Guild sent a letter to county party chairmen to express frustration that state party Chairman David Pepper and Executive Director Greg Beswick haven’t been personally at the table in negotiations and, the party has hired a law firm that tends to financially support Republicans. The dispute has put the party that usually has the backing of organized labor into the position of management during contract negotiations. “These are hardworking workers, and it has been easy in the past for this type of worker to get Read Story
MILITARY commanders have been given a 24 hour ultimatum by the Nigeria Union of Petroleum and Natural Gas Workers (Nupeng) to vacate the premises of an oil and gas firm in Delta State or they will embark on an indefinite strike.   Yesterday morning, soldiers took over the premises of Sterling Energy Exploration Company (Seepco) and its drilling arm, British Oil and Gas in Warri, Delta State. Following the occupation which happened at the invitation of the company, all the staff and Nupeng members were barred from entering the premises, prompting the union to immediately call an emergency meeting Lagos to discuss the matter.   Following their meeting, Nupeng's president Williams Akporeha, called on the chief of army staff Lt General Tukur Buratai to withdraw his soldiers from the company immediately. He also called on the Delta State governor to wade into the matter, adding that the union had directed its members in Warri to immediately stop working in response to the intimidation by their employer and harassment by the military.   Mr Akporeha said: "Nupeng as an organization has written to the chief of army staff that soldiers be removed from the work site, that what we have on ground is not a terrorist situation but an industrial relations matter. Our prayers right now is that those soldiers that are there be redeployed within the next 24 hours or else we shall have no option but to embark on a nationwide industrial action.”   According to Mr Akporeha, over 2,000 of its members had been sacked by Seepco for active unionism, describing the action as oppressive and a height of high handedness on the part of the firms. He added that Seepco had seven land rigs drilling in Kwale, Warri but that only two of them belonged to the union, pointing out that efforts by the other five groups to be unionised was resisted by the multinational corporation.   Mr Akporeha said the union in an attempt to resolve the matter, issued a press statement but was shocked that soldiers were brought in forcing members to renounce their membership of the union in order to keep their jobs. He alleged that the firm owned by Indians, forced workers with the help of the military into accepting working conditions that were not in line with labour laws of Nigeria.   “When the union decided to question why the company decided to continue to resist the rights of workers to unionise, what we saw was deployment of military troops to hound and evacuate those workers that agreed to be part of the union. We feel that there are some processes that are no more fashionable in a democratic and a decent society than bringing soldiers to intimate harmless workers who are asking for their rights and especially just mere rights to identify with a union.   “As we speak, soldiers are distributing new employment forms of none identification with union to members if they must remain on the job. We have directed our members in Delta State to withdraw their services in protest of this unfortunate situation and we are using this opportunity to also ask the governor of the state to immediately intervene to avoid turning his state into a dance floor for industrial crisis,” Mr Akporeha said. Read Story
Thousands of Chicago hotel workers initiated a strike at 25 properties on Sept. 7, a union spokesperson told Bloomberg Law. Read Story
The mayor was in Hamilton today... Read Story
Due to the lack of payment to at least 2,000 teachers of the federal subsystem, next Monday, classes will be suspended in about 7,000 basic education... Read Story
by Jacob Huebert Can the government use campaign finance laws to give some groups a political advantage over others?The answer to that question might seem obvious like an obvious “no.” After all, the First Amendment and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment generally require the... Read Story
After three weeks, prisoners will have ended their work and hunger strikes, but their demands are no less powerful. Read Story