PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Corporate change may follow, but not as quickly as desired. Read Story
The end could be on the horizon for the United Auto Workers union's four-week long strike against General Motors. Read Story
Employee leaders say they say they won’t do extra work beyond what’s required in their contracts... Read Story
Howes: UAW leadership struggles to close deal with GM The Detroit News Published 11:07 PM EDT Oct 14, 2019 UAW Local 163 union members Stephen Alfaro of Southfield, Ryan Pappas of Taylor and Jeremy Council of Romulus, picket in front of GM World Headquarters at the Renaissance Center in downtown Detroit Friday morning. Todd McInturf, The Detroit News One month into the longest United Auto Workers national strike against General Motors Co. since 1970, a former senior labor negotiator for a Detroit automaker is floating an obvious question: “Does the UAW leadership have what it takes to close a deal,” Colin Lightbody, a retired bargainer for FCA, asked in a blog post headline Monday. He’s not sure. And it's safe to say, based on background chats the past few weeks, that not a lot of folks on the outside looking in are, either. Lightbody's “red flags” include the federal investigation into union corruption, an “ever-changing list of outstanding issues” that appears to be frustrating and confusing the membership, and that “top UAW leaders have never really been to the ‘show’” of national contract talks with Detroit’s automakers. He sees the union's decision to wage three strikes simultaneously at GM, at Aramark Corp., at Mack Trucks Inc. as at least an implied dilution of leadership attention. And continued signaling that the union could well decide to keep 46,000 GM members on strike between reaching a tentative agreement and a ratification vote signals confidence in leadership's ability to get a deal ratified — or maybe the precise opposite?  Based on the results so far, he’s asking fair questions. This lengthening walkout risks becoming an economic train wreck for GM, for the striking workers, for the Michigan economy, for the Detroit-based industry and for the union's ability to sell itself to would-be members in efforts to organize non-union automakers. Sure, at least one Wall Street analyst is expressing scant concern, for now, anyway. In a note Monday, Adam Jonas of Morgan Stanley LLC wrote that GM investors are "comfortable" with an extended strike costing billions so long as the result preserves "long-term cost and strategic flexibility." That remains to be seen. The automaker's unprecedented public commitments to save its Detroit-Hamtramck plant from closure, to build a battery-cell plant in northeast Ohio's Mahoning Valley, to hold health care cost-sharing to a tenth of the national average, to boost ratification bonuses above the previously confirmed $8,000, and to uncap the hourly profit-sharing formula won't come cheaply. Strikes are intended to hurt, economically speaking. They're supposed to be more costly to the employer than to employees, to make material gains at the bargaining table worth the pain of the picket line and meager strike pay, to secure the long-term interests of employees even at the risk of increasing costs for employers. Whether those calculations hold remains to be seen. Lost wages are recouped at the bargaining table, not with strike pay. Even if the UAW manages to retain enviable health care coverage, to gain a sweetened profit-sharing formula for members, to secure the $9 billion in capital investment already promised by GM in a pair of unprecedented public affirmations, other downsides loom. Profit-sharing for 2019, payable next year, is certain to take a hit as U.S. losses from the strike mount. GM shares are down nearly 8% since the strike began last month, hitting shareholders — including the UAW's Retiree Health-Care Trust that owns roughly 7% of the Detroit automaker in the wake of its bankruptcy a decade ago. Lost production of high-margin vehicles likely will be difficult to recoup the longer the strike lasts, elongating the strike's effect long after it is settled and a new contract ratified. And any corresponding hit to U.S. market share would exacerbate the excess capacity problem GM is trying to address by its controversial decision to move to idle four U.S. plants, including two in southeast Michigan. Striking is the easy part for the UAW. The hard work for both sides comes in ending a walkout that shows just how little some parts of Old Detroit have changed. daniel.howes@detroitnews.com (313) 222-2106 Daniel Howes’ column runs Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Follow him on Twitter @DanielHowes_TDN, listen to his Saturday podcasts, or catch him 3 and 10 p.m. Thursdays on Michigan Radio’s “Stateside,” 91.7 FM. Published 11:07 PM EDT Oct 14, 2019 Read Story
A letter to local union leaders said the agenda for the meeting included a "contract update and any other agenda items to be determined," leaving the door open for talks to continue to potentially reach a tentative agreement ahead of the meeting. Read Story
CEO’s salary rose by 34 per cent as telco continues to fight union over workers' pay... Read Story
As the strikers resume work, Services Employee International Union (SEIU) Local 521 negotiators is expected to return to the bargaining table Tuesday in their second meeting with County representatives since the beginning of the strike. Read Story
The United Auto Workers invites local union leaders to a meeting on Thursday for a GM (NYSE:GM) negotiation update.Historically, such a summons has happened when a tentative agreement has been reached... Read Story
AZ Big Media Thousands plan to strike at ASARCO Arizona properties | AZ Big Media... Read Story
Smaller UAW ranks dampen GM strike's impact The Detroit News Published 12:01 AM EDT Oct 14, 2019 The United Auto Workers has seen its membership — and influence — dwindle over the last several decades. And that's cushioning the impact of the national strike against General Motors Co., which would have been greater  two decades ago. Look no further than the last time the labor union went on strike against GM for more than two days. Some 3,400 UAW members walked off the job for 54 days at the Flint Metal Center in 1998. That resulted in 193,000 layoffs due to the ripple effect of production stoppages at GM plants around the country. By the second week, then-President Bill Clinton had publicly called for a resolution. GM lost around $4.5 billion over the course of the walkout, which would be more than $7 billion today. That was the result of a strike at a single plant. In 1970, some 340,000 GM-UAW members walked off the job in a national strike. The UAW had the same number of members in its GM segment then as it has in nearly the entire UAW now. The union reported it had 395,703 members last year. That's roughly one-quarter of its 1979 peak of about 1.5 million members. As the UAW's national strike against GM stretches toward a fifth week, the Impact is weaker than it would have been in decades past. Paul Sancya, AP As the ongoing national strike against GM by the UAW stretches into a fifth week, the economic impact of the strike has been minimal outside of Michigan and in individual cities with GM plants and automotive suppliers that have laid off workers as a result of the walkout. "The UAW is in a much weaker position," said Patrick Anderson, CEO of the East Lansing-based Anderson Economic Group. "There's no question that if we had a strike of this duration two decades ago, I wouldn't be one of the only people pointing out that there was a recession risk. You would have seen pain much sooner." The UAW declined to comment. This strike has cost the automaker around $1.13 billion. The 46,000 UAW members walking picket lines outside 55 GM facilities are getting by on $250 weekly strike pay. About 100 suppliers have laid off 12,000 workers since the strike started. A report issued last week by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the manufacturing sector lost 2,000 jobs during the month of September, though economists didn't attribute that to the strike that began halfway through the month. Grant Thornton LLP Chief Economist Diane Swonk attributed that contraction to "weakness related to tariffs and trade." The full national impact of the walkout will not start to become clear until the October employment report comes out Nov. 1, she said. Depending on when the strike ends, she expects it will have "a very small impact" on the third quarter, but she expects those losses to be recouped over the remainder of the year. "It does have spillover effects," Swonk said. "It is affecting suppliers, and it is affecting production in both the U.S. and in Canada, but GM isn't as big as it once was, and the effects are smaller than they once were." East Lansing's Anderson Economic Group estimated employees have lost $624 million in wages nationwide; there has been $250 million lost in federal tax revenue. Closer to home, Michigan has lost $13.8 million in tax revenue. A greater number of automotive suppliers are feeling the pinch during the ongoing strike than they might have just a decade ago because carmakers outsource more parts now. "The economic impact is still pretty big," said Kristin Dziczek, vice president of industry, labor and economics at Ann Arbor's Center for Automotive Research. "It's just that they don't all work for GM anymore." Anderson and Dziczek said UAW membership has fallen — especially at GM — due to reasons largely outside the union's control. In 1985, auto workers in Canada split into their own Canadian Auto Workers union, which has since combined with Unifor. And in the 1990s, GM sold off its parts businesses such as Detroit-based American Axle & Manufacturing Inc. and what is now Aptiv PLC. A restructuring of GM following the 2008 bankruptcy shuttered some plants. The automaker has moved some production outside the U.S.; its San Luis Potosi Assembly plant in Mexico opened in 2008. More recently under CEO Mary Barra, GM has pushed to control fixed costs and is a much more disciplined company. It has turned to more suppliers to build components for GM products, and moved some work in the plants, such as janitorial work, outside of the company. As Anderson sees it, "General Motors is an entirely different company. It's a company that sells a majority of its products in China, not the U.S." The automaker's U.S. market share in 2000 was near 30%; by 2018, that share had fallen to about 17%. Stalling U.S. sales don't hit as hard as they once did because the automaker sells so many of its products outside the U.S. “When I started there was 300,000 of us," said Robert Gidley, 65, a 41-year toolmaker at GM's Romulus engine plant. "We’re at about 48,000 now. It’s a different time."  ithibodeau@detroitnews.com Twitter: @Ian_Thibodeau Staff writers Breana Noble and Kalea Hall contributed. Published 12:01 AM EDT Oct 14, 2019 Read Story
The Royal Mail has announced that consumers' deliveries could face huge disruption this Black Friday and Christmas, if workers agree to a strike. Read Story
Some of Pennsylvania's most powerful labor unions have removed a key hurdle for workers who wish to resign their membership following a series of lawsuits. Read Story
A threatened strike by Chicago teachers is testing a strategy employed by a growing number of urban teachers unions convinced that transforming contentious contract talks into discussions about class sizes and student services wins public support and can be a difference maker at the... Read Story
As the General Motors strike grinds on, adding to the economic drag on Michigan and other US midwestern car manufacturing hubs. Read Story
Our last update on the GM-UAW strike revolved around union reps playing hardball on issues like health care, wages, temporary employees, skilled trades, and job security. The United Auto Workers sent General Motors’ proposals back, holding its nose in disapproval. Read Story
The decision was taken during a tripartite meeting at Kolkata’s New Secretariat Building where representatives of the workers’ union and planters’ association met Labour Minister Moloy Ghatak. Read Story
General Motors Co took the unusual step of appealing directly to its unionized e... Read Story
The United Auto Workers strike against General Motors may be close to ending. Read Story
TUCSON, Ariz., Oct. 11, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- The United Steelworkers (USW) today said that about 2,000 hourly workers at five ASARCO LLC, locations in Arizona... Read Story
A letter sent to union members Friday indicates that United Auto Workers and General Motors Co. could be one step closer to reaching a tentative agreement. That's only if GM accepts the latest proposal. Read Story
Betty Johnson, who has worked on General Motors assembly lines in Michigan and Tennessee for more than 34 years, said she knew a strike by the United Auto Workers would mean personal sacrifice. Read Story
Teachers in Park County could go on strike beginning Monday if their union and the school district fail to reach a compensation agreement. Read Story
The United Auto Workers (UAW) strike against General Motors Company (NYSE: GM) continues to take a toll on its  Mexico-based facilities. GM announced ... Read Story
Employees of at least 30 public universities stopped work on Wednesday to demand additional funding from the federal government. Read Story
I haven’t read Mike Monteiro’s new book Ruined by Design, so I can’t say whether it’s any good. But I wouldn’t be surprised if it isn’t available at Amazon for all that much longer, now that its cover encourages Amazon workers to form a labor union. Read Story
A book based on ideas associated with a labor group from the early 20th century has provided a blueprint for organizing without a union. Read Story
Thousands of Santa Clara County employees will continue their strike into its ninth day with no signs of ceasing their picketing and protest efforts. County employees allege unfair labor practices and are demanding higher wages. Read Story
As the General Motors strike grinds on, more auto suppliers and contractors are sending workers home, adding to the economic drag on Michigan and other US midwestern car manufacturing hubs. Read Story
As the General Motors strike enters its fourth week, company officials and union negotiators are still fighting about wages, retirement benefits, and the fate of an idled Chevy factory in Lordstown, Ohio. Read Story
Registered nurses at UChicago Medicine Ingalls Memorial Hospital in Harvey, Ill., have voted to unionize, according to a news release from the National Nurses Organizing Committee/ National Nurses United. Read Story
Get breaking national and world news, broadcast video coverage, and exclusive interviews. Find the top news online at ABC news. Read Story
The employees of Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Solutions have just become the first cannabis workers in the state to join a union. Read Story
A good life for workers and a healthy natural environment aren't mutually exclusive. Read Story
General Motors brass abruptly pulled the brakes on a meeting with its workers’ union Tuesday, following a weekend during which talks over creating more manufacturing jobs in the US broke down. Read Story
DETROIT -- Talks between General Motors and the United Auto Workers union hit a snag Tuesday over what the union says is a lack of commitment by GM to build…... Read Story
The strike at the No. 1 U.S. carmaker began on Sept. 16, with its 48,000 members of the United Auto Workers (UAW) union seeking higher pay, greater job security, a bigger share of the automaker's profit and protection of healthcare benefits. Read Story