PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Sacramento City Teachers Association announced they are prepared to strike for the second time. The second strike is set for May 22, the association said Tuesday. Read Story
Miners at the Sibanye Gold Ltd platinum mine were trapped underground after the exit to the Thembelani shaft was blocked by malfunctioning transporting equipment. Read Story
The former vice president is leaning on his long-standing alliance with labor as he launches his presidential bid. But most major groups are holding off on endorsements. Read Story
TRAVELLERS flying to and from Luton Airport are set to face days of disruption. We explain when the strike will happen and why? Here’s what we know. When will the strike happen?Security guards are…... Read Story
French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner on Tuesday said more than 7,400 police and security forces would be deployed in Paris for Wednesday's May Day marches in case of violence by protesters. Read Story
Vice President Joe Biden is the latest White House candidate to embrace a national wage hike... Read Story
Workers earning less than $40K a year are enjoying strong wage gains, while pay is lagging at some white-collar jobs... Read Story
A tentative agreement has been reached between Unifor school bus drivers and Stock Transportation, potentially averting a strike that would have impacted more than 8,300 Toronto District School Board and Toronto Catholic District School Board students. Read Story
Astria Regional Medical Center in Yakima, Wash., and Astria Toppenish (Wash.) Hospital, have reached new contracts with two unions representing hundreds of employees at the institutions, according to a Yakima Herald report. Read Story
Unions used traditional May Day marches across Spain on Wednesday to call on the... Read Story
BERLIN - The Latest on May Day events and rallies around the world (all times local):... Read Story
Why We Celebrate Labor Day & Its Significance?Alagi Yorro Jallow Fatoumatta: It is necessary to ask what activities are planned by Gambian Workers on May 1 and whether it is going to be another day of empty political rhetoric; travel to visit relatives and friends; mass sports, or whether it will... Read Story
I have been working to protect the rights of women workers for 25 years, and whether I speak to domestic workers, election workers, farmers, or activists, their experience of sexual harassment and violence has been a common thread worldwide. Read Story
French police fired tear gas to push back masked demonstrators in central Paris ... Read Story
SEOUL, May 1 (Korea Bizwire) — Tens of thousands of South Korean workers marked Labor Day with a rally in central Seoul on Wednesday, …... Read Story
European capitals are bracing for a day of violence as protesters prepare for the traditional May Day demonstrations from Paris to Athens. More than 7,000 police have been deployed in the French capital amid heightened tensions with the yellow vest movement. Read Story
Car-sharing companies are urging customers in Berlin not to park vehicles in areas where May Day protests are expected…... Read Story
After reporting noose at auto plant, woman says company won't let her return to work Detroit Free Press Published 5:53 AM EDT May 1, 2019 DETROIT — Charlene Lust says she has no doubt that what she saw in a Michigan auto plant in February was a noose. Seeing the rope hanging in an area where she was coming to help a coworker clean up, Lust said she was overcome by a feeling of sadness. “I literally almost fainted. I’ve never seen one,” Lust said from her living room on Detroit’s west side this month. “When I saw the noose, I was like stuck.” She snapped a photo of the rope, which she believes was left as a message to African Americans like her, in the area of the Macomb County plant’s paint shop. It reminded her of the day in 2015 she helped nab a pedophile, an action that garnered her a civilian citation from the local police department.  Charlene Lust of Detroit was honored for helping nab a pedophile in 2015. The mother of four is fighting for her job and facing eviction after reporting a noose at the Sterling Heights Assembly plant in February. Eric D. Lawrence “It startled me. It felt like the moment I caught the young boy being molested at the park. It was like one of those shocks,” Lust said. Now, the 34-year-old mother of four is fighting for her job and praying she can hold onto her home, two tasks that have become a challenge because she said she was told she cannot return to work. The reason? Photographing, and possibly posting on Facebook a video of, that looped rope hanging in the Sterling Heights Assembly plant. Although the plant makes the 2019 Ram 1500 pickup, Lust was not employed by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. Instead, she worked for a subcontractor, MacLellan Integrated Services, a company based in Lexington, Kentucky. Lust says she was terminated and that she is not welcome to return to work. Noose 2 Charlene Lust MacLellan has not responded to multiple requests for comment. Lust has filed complaints claiming discrimination based on race and retaliation with the Michigan Department of Civil Rights against MacLellan, FCA and her union. The UAW, according to spokesman Brian Rothenberg, has filed a grievance against MacLellan on Lust’s behalf. More: Burberry apologizes for hoodie with noose around the neck More: 3 teachers on leave following display of noose images labeled 'back to school necklaces' 'Exhaustive investigation' FCA spokeswoman Jodi Tinson said she had not seen the civil rights complaint so could not comment on it. “What I can say is that FCA does not tolerate retaliation against any person who reports a violation or participates in an investigation involving a workplace incident. Such behavior is strictly prohibited and anyone found engaging in such behavior will be dealt with accordingly,” Tinson said in an email. More than 7,800 people work at the Sterling Heights Assembly plant, also known as SHAP. FCA said last month that the report of the noose "was the subject of an exhaustive investigation conducted by external investigators. Although we have been unable to identify the person responsible, if and when that person is identified, their relationship with the company will be terminated." A post in February on a Facebook page for plant workers referenced "several disturbing incidents over the last couple of months." Activists have also been raising alarms about a rise in racist incidents at auto plants. Photographing in auto plants is generally not permitted, but Lust says her employer, MacLellan, had encouraged her and others to take pictures showing their work. Although there are no general statutes protecting employees who post things on social media, some activities, such as protesting adverse working conditions, are protected, according to New York University Law School Professor Samuel Estreicher. An African American seeing a noose at her workplace could be considered an adverse working condition, and "certainly a failure to take it down would be," Estreicher said. He noted that posting a video of a noose on company property on social media, rather than just taking a picture to report it, might show poor judgment, but the maintenance company should have found some accommodation for Lust, such as a similar position with another client, rather than keeping her from returning to work. Because what she did might be considered a “protected concerted activity,” Lust could also have additional recourse. For instance, she could file a charge with the National Labor Relations Board. “The law we enforce gives employees the right to act together to try to improve their pay and working conditions, with or without a union. If employees are fired, suspended or otherwise penalized for taking part in protected group activity, the National Labor Relations Board will fight to restore what was unlawfully taken away,” according to the NLRB website. Facing eviction In the meantime, Lust is concerned about her immediate future. Her landlord, Southfield-based Go2Guy Property Management, has already sent paperwork demanding she pay $1,250 in overdue rent or face possible eviction. More: Fiat Chrysler investigates report of noose at Sterling Heights Assembly More: UAW group: Racial incidents need to stop, be condemned by leadership For Lust, the possible loss of a home she has been in since she started her job with MacLellan last year has her relying on her faith in God and hoping for a miracle. Recent weeks have been particularly tough with a break-in at her home and loss of money to add to the uncertainty. It’s a far cry from 2015 when she was attending Macomb Community College and working toward what she hoped would be a career in law enforcement as a detective. That summer she had even been honored by Warren Police for her heroism chasing down a 35-year-old man who had been sexually assaulting a 7-year-old boy at Jaycee Park in Warren. Transportation troubles and the need to provide for her children now ages 7-16 derailed her plans, and Lust said she was forced to work various temporary jobs. When she landed the job with MacLellan, she said she was thrilled. “I was like, ‘I need full-time work. I can’t keep hopping from temp job to temp job. Finally. I’ve got me a job. I’m landed.' I was so excited," Lust said. "I want to work." Follow Eric D. Lawrence on Twitter: @_ericdlawrence.   Published 5:53 AM EDT May 1, 2019 Read Story
May Day has its roots in pagan festivals, but it's also recognized as International Worker's Day... Read Story
Thousands of trade union members and activists are marking May Day by marching through Asia’s capitals and demanding better working conditions and expanding…... Read Story
Scandinavian airline SAS began talks with pilot unions in Oslo on Wednesday morning in the first sign of an end to the deadlock behind the six-day strike.... Read Story
Can Democrats figure out how to get unions back into the equation in 2020? Read Story
On May 1, 2019, Labor Day, various groups championing workers’ rights took to the streets and called for better working conditions... Read Story
Regularization, higher wages, and safer workplaces became the rallying call of women workers on Labor Day, as groups assert their rights amid “worsening work conditions” in the country. Read Story