PSLabor News

PSLabor News

The Sacramento City Unified teachers union announced Friday that it called on the state superintendent to establish a committee to help avert a state takeover of the school district and the union’s looming strike in two weeks. Read Story
The cooperative movement is showing that worker-owned businesses can not only survive, but thrive. Read Story
Becker's Hospital Review reported the following hospital-union events after April 26. Read Story
A recent study revealed that 108,000 millionaires “migrated across borders” in 2018 to Australia, the United States, Canada, and Switzerland, and out of Turkey, India, Russia, and China. Nothing harms a country more than the loss of financial and human capital. Read Story
The Paterson school district is bracing for steep job cuts and programming changes starting in September. Read Story
Professional staff voted 43-41 for representation by the American Federation of Teachers, while non-professional staff voted against representation 47-32. Read Story
DİSK-Birleşik Metal İş (United Metalworkers’ Union) started strike on 7th of May at Cem-Bialetti  factory which is Turkish subsidiary of famous Italian Mocha-pot producer Bialetti Group. Cem-Bialetti produces kitchenware such as saucepan, pot, frypan and lowpot.  Strike started after failed collective bargaining negotiations. Negotiations has stuck on pay-related articles. Company only offered a pay increase even less than the official inflation rate for the related period. After company renewed its offer on 7th of May, workers of the factory organized a ballot at the local union building and decided to go on the strike. Photo Read Story
Tata Steel chiefs admit concerns over Port Talbot but pledge it will keep running after merger plans falter. Read Story
Tata Steel and ThyssenKrupp had signed definitive agreements in June 2018 to combine their steel businesses in Europe to create a 50-50 pan European joint venture company... Read Story
Being on strike is “kinda scary,” said one picketing nurse in Toledo, Ohio—but “kinda empowering,” broke in another. “We’re doing this for nurses across the board.” After 58 bargaining sessions totaling 450 hours since last summer, nearly 1,900 hospital workers at Mercy Health St. Read Story
The battle between the Writers Guild of America and Hollywood talent agencies has captivated the entire industry — but it could turn out to be merely a preliminary skirmish in a larger labor war that may see the guild go on strike next year. Read Story
BY: May 9, 2019 4:55 am Minnesota Personal Care Attendants (PCAs) are speaking out about the Trump administration's decision to prevent unions from taking hundreds of millions of dollars from their paychecks. The Obama-era rule allowed Medicaid payments to be diverted to government unions, which the Trump administration found violates the Social Security Act. "The rule change means family members and friends who stay home to care for loved ones will keep all of the Medicaid payments intended for them, rather than paying hundreds of dollars to the SEIU," the state's fiscal conservative think tank, the Center of the American Experiment, said in a statement. The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is one of two of the largest public sector unions in the country that lost more than 90 percent of their fee-paying nonmembers less than one year after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Janus vs. AFSCME. "Currently, the state of Minnesota takes money out of Medicaid support checks meant to improve the quality of life of America's sick, elderly and disabled, and gives it to the SEIU," the center explains. The process of unions siphoning money from Medicaid became legal in 2013 after former Gov. Mark Dayton and the majority-DFL Legislature passed a law stating that PCAs were "public employees." But Minnesota PCAs maintain that they are not public employees and don't receive public employment benefits like pensions or health care. Rather, they are often caring for family members and others in their own homes. In Minnesota, the SEIU has taken 3 percent of PCA gross wages with a cap of $948. "According to estimates based on federal filings, the SEIU in Minnesota skimmed $4.7 million from PCAs’ Medicaid payments in 2016," the center states—an amount higher than the average dues K-12 teachers pay to the Education Minnesota union. "What this means is that, while the collective bargaining units remain certified for now, the unions will have to collect their own dues," Kim Crockett, the center's vice president and general counsel, said. "That protects the program dollars from abuse and forces the unions to demonstrate value to their remaining members." Kris Greene, a Lakeville mother of a disabled daughter and a PCA, argues her home "is not a union workplace." "The Medicaid program worked better before the SEIU horned its way into our lives," she added. "We are grateful for this rule change but the remaining problem is that the SEIU still speaks for me and all Choice PCAs at the Capitol. But they never ask me what I want." Greene helps lead MNPCA.org, a coalition of PCAs trying to decertify the SEIU and raise awareness about the abuse of Medicaid funds. She is also lead plaintiff in litigation challenging the use of Medicaid dollars on unions. "No parent should be coerced into paying a union just to care for their own disabled child," Catherine Hunter, a PCA from Burnsville with several disabled children, said. "Instead of steady pay raises across the board, the SEIU has lobbied for paid time off and training stipends that are hard to navigate and of little use to most PCAs, especially when we care for a family member. The SEIU has made it harder for the disabled to get the coverage they need. This rule change will help focus PCAs on whether the SEIU has helped or harmed the program." Prior to the final rule change, the center submitted a public comment supporting the change. It said: "Despite the clear prohibition in Section 32, Minnesota is diverting Medicaid monies from their intended purpose—paying for care for the disabled—to subsidize political activities conducted by government unions, as well as ‘training' used for union recruitment and indoctrination; and while assignments of union dues from payments to home health care providers have been both voluntary and involuntary in Minnesota, the voluntariness of an assignment is irrelevant under Section 32, which prohibits even voluntary assignments, except to government agencies or by court order." In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Harris v Quinn that PCAs paid through Medicaid were not public employees and could not be compelled to pay union fees. In 2018, the court extended that ruling to all public employees in Janus v AFSCME. Doug Seaton, a labor attorney and president of the Upper Midwest Law Center (UMLC) who represents MNPCA.org, said, "The rule change makes it more likely that the SEIU can be decertified, or even that the union will walk away from PCA representation because the SEIU is in this for the money and very few PCAs will pay them directly." The center created EmployeeFreedomMN.com as part of its awareness campaign to help public employees make educated decisions about their union membership. The website answers frequently asked questions about Janus in addition to providing practical information like how to find their union card, and learning what types of representation to which non-union members are entitled after they resign their membership. The site also simplifies the process to leave government unions. The UMLC is also representing Laura Loescher, who manages the Scandia Elementary School site in the Forest Lake Public School District, and is challenging her union membership and continued dues deductions. Seaton says UMLC "will also stand up for other public employees who come forward wanting to exercise their rights to free speech." In a statement, SEIU said it would challenge the rule in court. "SEIU members plan to challenge this rule in court and will continue to join other SEIU members and Fight for $15 and a Union leaders in calling on elected leaders and candidates to commit to making sure all working people – Black, white and brown – have the opportunity to join together in a union, no matter where they work," the statement said. Read Story
Doctors and nurses voted in favor of joining a union while medical assistants and front desk staff did not.... Read Story
Amazon said on Friday it was in talks with employees in Poland after unions threatened strike action, seeking higher pay in distribution centers. Read Story
The Public Service Alliance of Canada — the civil service's biggest union — has walked away from talks aimed at reaching new contracts affecting more than 100,000 workers. Read Story
Over 100,000 McDonald's employees will receive huge pay boosts after the company follows suit of KFC, Domino's, Woolworths and Coles. Read Story
A federal judge has ruled that a lawsuit filed by the United Auto Workers against General Motors over the closing of three plants should be heard in Ohio. Read Story
In These Times features award-winning investigative reporting about corporate malfeasance and government wrongdoing, insightful analysis of national and international affairs, and sharp cultural criticism about events and ideas that matter. Read Story
In this installment of No Class, columnist Kim Kelly explains the latest round of attacks against the working class, this time focused on home care workers. Read Story
Locked Out Key Food Employees Back To Work - Park Slope, NY - "The lockout is not over, the lockout is postponed," union leaders said about a deal to let employees work during 30 days of negotiations. Read Story
College lecturers in Glasgow are to go ahead with two days of strike action next week after talks broke down. Read Story
John Anzalone, senior Biden adviser, teams up with Trump team to help with passage of the new NAFTA deal. Read Story
The union representing 7,000 Beer Store employees is launching an advertising blitz warning of job losses, price increases and a reported $1 billion penalty if Premier Doug Ford expands the sale of booze to corner stores. Read Story
Delta tried to convince employees their money is better spent on video games than union dues in a poster making the rounds on Twitter. Read Story
The move comes after the National Labor Relations Board put on hold a potential new union election at Volkswagen's Chattanooga production plant last week. Read Story
The two giants signed a deal last June to combine their European steel branches. EU regulators want both firms to sell substantial parts of their business to avoid reducing competition in the market. Read Story
Mexico’s Federal Official Gazette published a decree setting forth major amendments to Federal Labor Law FLL The Decree provides that the FCCLR should commence operations no later than two years from May 2, 2019 Labor Tribunals commence no later than three years from the date... Read Story
Both primary and secondary schools teachers voted on whether a mega strike would go ahead. Read Story
By Aisha Al-Muslim Marriott International Inc., the world's largest hotel company, posted weaker than expected revenue growth from guest stays in the latest period, but said its business is... Read Story
Burger giant McDonalds will soon start paying out tens of millions of dollars in higher wages after it finally agreed to pay weekend penalty rates. Read Story
Amazon workers in Poland are demanding that their salaries be roughly doubled, t... Read Story
The South African Typographical Union (SATU) on Thursday said it was "disappointed" by the process undertaken by Tiso Blackstar to cut jobs. Read Story
The wonky minimum wage debate giving House Democrats a headache, explained. Read Story
Members of four unions at Longhill School say they are prepared to strike in protest at a £140,000 cut to the school's special educational needs budget. Longhill, in Falmer Road, Rottingdean, has suffered the same funding crisis as schools up and down the country, and the Schools Cuts website... Read Story
Global mining giant Glencore now closer to owning controversial PolyMet copper nickely mining proposal in Northern Minnesota. Read Story
Teachers in Union City and South Hayward have announced they will go on strike later this month if their union and school district cannot reach a contract deal. Read Story
Uber and Lyft drivers have called a one-day strike on the day of Uber's initial public offering. But their strike is about more than fighting the exploitation of the “sharing economy” — it’s about a right to the city. Read Story
The groups on Wednesday said nursing home care is reaching a historic crisis in Pennsylvania. Read Story
At a vote held on 27 April 2019, UFCW Canada Local 1006A members working at Maple Leaf Foods voted 98 percent in favour of taking strike action to get a fair contract. Maple Leaf Foods announced in November 2018 that it will be closing its Toronto facility by 2021. In light of the company’s decision to close, workers' main priority is to achieve fair severance and closure language. The approximately 680 workers who process poultry at the facility have struggled to get a fair deal since it expired 23 September 2018. "The ‘deep regrets’ expressed by CEO Michael McCain are sorely missing at the negotiating table,” said Don Taylor, lead negotiator for Local 1006A. "Maple Leaf has failed to demonstrate a meaningful commitment to do more than the bare minimum as workers' jobs disappear. We’re calling on the company to do the right thing by our members who have worked so hard to ensure Maple Leaf's success." Many members at the plant are long-service employees. The plant closure means the loss of good-paying unionised jobs in Toronto. Maple Leaf Foods recently reported $50.1 million in 2019 Q1 profit, with sales up 11 percent from a year ago. UFCW Local 1006A represents over 35,000 workers in Ontario in all sectors of the economy, including the manufacturing, hotel, retail, restaurant, and meat processing industries. Read Story