PSLabor News

PSLabor News

Teachers Ratify Contract in Close Vote - Union City, CA - The strike is officially over. Teachers will return to the classroom Monday, as the last week of school before summer vacation begins. Read Story
Hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of Californians working as independent contractors may be forced to become employees . Read Story
What happens when new leaders run for office and beat an eight-term incumbent? In the Baltimore Teachers Union, it seems, the incumbent tries for a second bite at the apple.A slate called “The Union We Deserve,” backed by two rank-and-file caucuses, ran for office this spring. Read Story
Citing recent progress at the bargaining table, teams representing 4,000 Kaiser Permanente mental health clinicians and health care professionals throughout California voted unanimously Sunday to call off an open-ended strike that was to have started Tuesday. Read Story
President Barack Obama championed charter schools, often putting him at odds with teachers unions. Now, 2020 Democratic presidential candidates sound much more wary.... Read Story
The senator spoke with workers at a rally at a local McDonald's store before marching with them to a state Democratic meeting... Read Story
The plaintiffs in the case are seeking class certification to represent others they believe have been discriminated against, a decision the court will make at a later date. In legal filings, Google has disputed that conservatives are an identifiable class under the law. In a decision, the judge on the case said the court “indeed has doubts” about the viability of the idea, but it is, for the time being, letting the case move ahead. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the ruling. In 2017, Damore published a memo questioning Google’s diversity practices and attributing gaps in engineering placements to biological differences between men and women. The memo was widely shared and criticized inside Google, and then the world, and Damore was eventually fired by the company. His attempt to fight back against the termination included bringing a complaint to the National Labor Relations Board, which decided Google was within its right to fire Damore. Read Story
Bernie Sanders joined striking McDonald's workers who are demanding a $15/hour minimum wage and a union. Read Story
The growing number of Latinos in unions is reshaping labor's focus, which may in turn help unions broaden their message and political influence, experts say.... Read Story
Andalucia will benefit the most, with the influx of tourists creating 28,420 permanent posts... Read Story
Glasgow Airport will be hit with another strike tomorrow as staff walk out follow a breakdown of talks with airport owners. Read Story
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has delayed its rulemaking to repeal the Obama-era Ambush Election Rule yet again. It is long past time for the Labor Board to repeal this assault on workers' rights, which it promised to do last winter. The Trump NLRB has taken initial steps to dismantle this ambush election scheme but Obama holdovers and career swamp-dwellers have already delayed repealing the rule twice. Moreover, the Labor Board has also failed to take multiple opportunities to roll back additional Obama-era rules blocking workers from voting out unions they oppose. They say in Washington, nothing moves unless it's pushed. That's why it's vital you tell Labor Board members to stop the delays by signing your petition below immediately. After you've signed, please help your National Right to Work Foundation continue defending worker freedom in the courts and at the NLRB by pitching in your most generous tax-deductible contribution right away. Sincerely, Mark Mix President, National Right to Work Petition to National Labor Relations Board Whereas: The Obama NLRB's ambush election scheme was designed to make union organizing drives one-sided as possible; and Whereas: Union bosses routinely use the ambush election scheme to expand Big Labor's power by trapping workers and forcing them to pay dues to a union that they oppose; and Whereas: Board-invented doctrines actively block employees from exercising their legal right to vote on whether to remove unwanted union representation; and Whereas: 94% of workers have not voted for the incumbent union. Therefore: I urge the National Labor Relations Board to stop delaying and immediately take action to rescind the Ambush Election Rule imposed in 2014 and implement other overdue reforms as called for by the National Right to Work Foundation to stop blocking workers from removing unions they oppose. Read Story
Teachers with the New Haven Unified School District on Sunday ratified the latest contract offered by the district, ending a 14-day strike. Read Story
In the fight for unionization within a precarious gig economy, Toronto Foodora couriers are demanding fairer compensation and protection.... Read Story
Robin J. Cartwright explores the historical origins of “workplace contractualism” in the U.S. — the predominant model of unionism, whereby workers and employers negotiate a contract. Read Story
THE second of two 12-hour strikes over pay and pensions has begun at Glasgow and Aberdeen airports. Read Story
A new rule will make it harder for many home care workers to pay union dues, a move that some say could ultimately impact the care that people with disabilities receive. Read Story
Glasgow Airport passengers faced "longer than normal queues" as staff at Glasgow and Aberdeen took industrial action. Read Story
Editorial staff at Vox went on strike yesterday after 14 months of negotiations failed to produce a union contract. Read Story
PASSENGERS travelling to and from Glasgow Airport have faced “two-hour queues” at security due to a staff walk out amid strike action.Others complained it was “chaos” due t…... Read Story
The workers of famous pearl shake chain Zagu went on strike Thursday to protest alleged "union busting and illegal contractualization."... Read Story
Glasgow Airport workers to strike four times in two weeks. Unite members will now strike for a fourth day on June 21 over a pay and pension dispute. Read Story
Get breaking national and world news, broadcast video coverage, and exclusive interviews. Find the top news online at ABC news. Read Story
Legislators in Albany are considering narrowing the scope of a bill that would define which public works project require higher wages. Read Story
The United Steelworkers says local unions representing Arconic (NYSE:ARNC) workers at the company's facilities in Davenport, Iowa, Lafayette, Ind., and Massena, N.Y., have granted their negotiating co... Read Story
More than 1500 offshore workers in Norway might go on a strike if a wage settlement with the Norwegian Shipowners’ Association – representing the companies – is not reached.Seadrill’s West Hercules is one of  the rigs that might be affected by a strike / Photographer Ole Jørgen Bratland/ Equinor ... Read Story
Boeing Co's largest supplier Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc is reducing it... Read Story
Backlash to the smart city planned for the Toronto waterfront has been bolstered by criticism by US venture capitalist Roger McNamee, who was an early investor in Google and Facebook. Read Story
Boeing Co's largest supplier Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc is reducing its workweek to 32 hours in response to the 737 MAX groundings, a labor ... Read Story
GLASGOW Airport users have been hit by security delays as the first of two 12-hour strikes began in a dispute over pay and pensions. Read Story
Employees at the Seattle institution will elect whether the group can be formed on June 18. Read Story
The Defense Department no longer plans to move staff from support agencies to the Defense Information Services Agency before the end of September, offic... Read Story
A California trade union is seeking to block a major residential construction project in the heart of housing-starved Silicon Valley, claiming there will be a bloodbath of birds due to the proposed building's reflective windows. Read Story
How the $15 minimum wage battle could play out in Delaware Delaware News Journal Published 10:48 AM EDT Jun 7, 2019 The biggest thing standing between Delaware workers and a $15 minimum wage may be the state's pro-business reputation. While several large companies such as Christiana Care Health System and Amazon already have raised their minimum wage jobs to $15, some lawmakers and lobbyists say many small businesses cannot afford it. The result, opponents say, would be prices rising for goods and services, and small businesses failing. All that is contributing to what could be a big vs. small, and urban vs. rural battle. Adding fuel to the argument are opponents who say they don't believe anyone stays in minimum wage jobs or tries to support a family on them.  "I don't buy it," said James DeChene, a lobbyist in the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce. "They may exist, but they are certainly not the bulk of minimum wage-earners in Delaware." Economist George Sharpley of the Delaware Department of Labor said he doesn't have state or national data that definitively track who lives on minimum wage, but he's sure there are people depending on minimum wage jobs in Delaware. "Some of them are bound to be supporting other people," he said. "The question is, how many?" Carrie Leishman, CEO of the Delaware Restaurant Association, said the minimum wage increase would send a message that Delaware is not a business-friendly state. “Everybody wants to talk about how great the economies are … but we’re vulnerable here in Delaware," Leishman said. “Look at what’s happened with Barclays." Here we go again A bill introduced by freshman Sen. Darius Brown, D-Wilmington — which is up for a committee hearing next week — would gradually increase the state's minimum wage by $1 per year until it hits $15 per hour by 2024.  Brown thinks that will lift families out of poverty and help them become self-sufficient. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: $15 per hour minimum wage is up for a vote next week Raising the minimum wage to $15 would be a leap from the state's current $8.75, set to increase again to $9.25 in October, thanks to a bill that last year passed by just one vote in the Senate. Raising the minimum wage might seem like a slam-dunk in a Democrat-controlled legislature, where new faces filled a significant number of the seats this year. But this year's version could still die if a handful of Democrats break ranks. Darius Brown, D-Wilmington East during the start of the 150th General Assembly at Legislative Hall in Dover. Jason Minto, The News Journal National enthusiasm for $15 Talk of a $15-per-hour wage is sweeping across the country. Democratic presidential candidates endorse the hike at the federal level, and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-Vermont, lambasted Walmart earlier this month for not paying workers that much. A handful of states are already rolling out their own $15 per-hour policy. That includes Maryland and New Jersey, which both passed legislation this year. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, wants his state to be next. Delaware seems primed to join the herd.  Passage would be in line with a 2016 poll from the University of Delaware Center for Political Communication indicating that most Delaware residents favored raising the federal minimum wage to $15. But, as seen with gun control, progressive lawmakers don't always get their way. The Democratic Party's failure to pass three controversial gun control measures last month was credited in part to a statewide grassroots movement from Democratic union members who pressured lawmakers enough to kill the bills in committee. Unlike gun restrictions, this wage hike has public backing from labor organizations, such as the AFL-CIO and Service Employees International Union. That's a good sign for those who want the wage hike. Carrie Leishman Photo provided Restaurant association CEO Leishman worries that unions will expect the minimum wage rule to be passed, and legislators will comply, especially with an election next year. "They financially supported a lot of progressive campaigns and may now be calling in that favor," she said. The uphill battle this time Some analysts and economists expect that the bill's fate will depend on how many of Delaware's commerce-minded lawmakers — including those in the majority party — will be convinced to raise wages.  "Any time you're dealing with jobs and people working ... the issue is, how many people are you talking about, and do they vote?" said Ed Ratledge, who does research on the state's demographics and public policy at the University of Delaware. Lawmakers are likely to hear in person from business owners, who often live close enough to voice their concerns face to face. “At some point, for sure, they would hear alarms raised by small business people,” said Laurence Seidman, an economics professor at the University of Delaware. “There will be merit in it.” Hitting close to home, even for lawmakers Rep. Bryan Shupe, R-Milford, who owns a doggie day care and local news business, worries about whether he can afford to pay his employees at $15 per hour. "It's an emotional subject," Shupe said. "You don't want to ever tell somebody that they're not worth $15 an hour." He added, "I don't want people to think that small business owners are deaf to people saying that they need more money."  Bryan Shupe is a Republican running for the state House of Representatives in the 36th District. Submitted by Bryan Shupe Shupe would rather have policies for training and education to help people find employment opportunities that pay more. He would also like to have more time for small businesses to adjust their budgets, rather than having to immediately add $1 per hour for the next five years. A two-year window to prepare would be nice, he said. Debate about the issue could focus on the time allotted for businesses to prepare, UD's Seidman expects. The bill's sponsors also could be asked to lower the proposed minimum wage to $12 instead of $15. But it's not clear whether watering it down would be enough. "There's a lot of individuals who say corporations can afford to pay $15 an hour for McDonald's, Starbucks, Walmart, that sort of thing," Shupe said. "And I agree with that. But it may put some of these smaller businesses out of business. Because we just can't afford it." Rural wages may also be lower because rural companies may not have to compete for workers, said Ben Zipperer, an economist with the Economic Policy Institute. He believes rural businesses would be able to sustain the wages. He said because there often are fewer employers per worker in rural areas, businesses can keep wages lower because they do not have to compete to get workers. "They can afford it because they're already keeping things artificially low," Zipperer said.  One conservative think tank that studies minimum wage policies, the Employment Policies Institute, estimates Delaware would lose 6,260 jobs — largely in retail and hospitality — with a $15-per-hour minimum wage. In addition, the institute's spokeswoman Samantha Summers said, states like Maryland and New Jersey don't have any precedents to study the impact of a minimum wage rise because no state has yet raised minimum wage all the way to $15. California is also still rolling out its hike, which caps in 2022, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Massachusetts, Illinois and D.C. are also still rolling out their $15-wage increases. Governor John Carney unveils the proposed budget for fiscal year 2020 during a presentation at the Delaware Public Archives Thursday. Daniel Sato, The News Journal Carney's position unannounced Gov. John Carney's spokesman said on Thursday that Carney has supported wages above $10 per hour, and he's open to considering $15 per hour. But Carney has "not taken a deep dive" into Brown's bill since it was filed nearly a week ago, and is concerned about how it could affect the labor market, the spokesman said. In March, Maryland's Republican Gov. Larry Hogan vetoed a new $15 per hour wage law, and the Democrat-controlled General Assembly overrode his veto. Some Delmarva officials worried the increase would hurt rural areas more than urban ones. Delaware lawmakers last year were able to bump the minimum wage by $1, and it wasn't easy. Democrats ended up having to barter with Republicans by passing a separate bill that lets employers pay 50 cents less than the minimum wage to workers who are either under 18 years old or on the first 90 days of the job. Some Democrats now want to rescind that 50-cent pay cut, but the bill that would do it has yet to leave committee. "I don't have the votes," said Rep. Kim Williams, D-Newport, the sponsor. "I'm going to attempt to ... at least to get it to the floor." How many workers make less than $15 per hour? DeChene with the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce thinks minimum wage earners tend to be first-time workers, retirees or living in a household where other members make above the minimum wage. James DeChene, Delaware State Chamber of Commerce Delaware State Chamber of Commerce He's skeptical about whether many Delaware residents earning minimum wage are the breadwinner of their family, or whether many people stay in a minimum wage job for a long time without moving up. He could not provide data to show whether he's right. Department of Labor economist Sharpley wrote in an email to The News Journal that national data show about half of those earning minimum wages are between 16 and 24 years old while another quarter of minimum wage earners are between 25 and 34. In Delaware, "just about all businesses" have at least some workers making less than $15 per hour, and about one-third of people who work in Delaware make less than $15 per hour, Sharpley wrote.  Wages decrease as you move South About a tenth of people working in the state makes less than $9.65 per hour, he estimates. Delaware Department of Labor data shows that as you travel down the state, wages get lower. Nearly half of the workers in Sussex County make $15 or less, the data said. Nearly half of New Castle County makes about $21 or less. And nearly half of Kent County makes about $17 or less. On top of that, about 13,000 workers in Delaware were making the minimum wage when it was $8.25 per hour at the end of last year, Sharpley said. A few thousand more probably joined those ranks when the minimum wage rose this year, he speculates. Sharpley said that more than half of those currently making minimum wage have jobs in food service, while the rest tend to either work in retail or administrative services, such as landscaping or security. Brown argues that the $15-per-hour wage would help workers access other job opportunities. But opponents think minimum wage jobs should stay low to encourage workers to move up. "There are opportunities and alternatives to quote-unquote minimum wage jobs," DeChene said. He cited manufacturing and construction as examples. "How do you justify having your first job at 16 and getting paid $15 an hour?" he added. "If I'm an employer, I'm not going to give that kid the first job. I'm going to hire someone older." Are you living on minimum wage? Sarah Gamard, who wrote this story, wants to talk to you. Contact her by calling (302) 324-2281 or by email at sgamard@delawareonline.com. Related Reading: How Delaware's gun control bills were stopped in their tracks Auditor defends decision to not investigate Odyssey Charter Published 10:48 AM EDT Jun 7, 2019 Read Story
A tentative agreement was reached Friday between teachers and the New Haven Unified School District to end a strike in Union City that has lasted 14 days. Read Story
When employers establish internal forums for employee comments, they may not anticipate that employees will use this as an opportunity to criticize the company and management. Employers... Read Story
At a protest Friday against the Ontario government, Premier Doug Ford was called a bully, a clown, a mini-Trump and a trash bag.And that was just in one sentence from a speaker at the suppertime pr…... Read Story
Graduate students at private universities are unionizing, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rulemaking and college administrators might stop them. Read Story